Working out after injury

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
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Rye93_2Rye93_2 Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
Hi guy's,

Hoping someone can help with this. I broke my foot around 2 and half months ago and have been unable to attend the gym. Since my injury, I have put on some weight especially around my stomach and chest. I've never been skinny or lean, but have noticed more increase and it's making self concious. I enjoyed going to the gym several times a week and really want to go back. When my cast came off, I used a walking stick, but now I dont need it, but I do walk with a limp and it does pain at times throughout the day which I take ibuprofen sometimes to help. I just wanted to know if its safe to go back and ease myself back in to my regular routine?

Im just nervouse in case i do further damage to my foot, but I could do with losing the excess weight i gained. Would there be any machines at the gym for cardio better suited for me at the moment to help me ease in maybe?

Sorry if this is long winded and if ive posted this somewhere its not meant to be, but advice would help.

Thanks.

Replies

  • PollycatPollycat Forumite
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    What advice did they give you regarding exercise at the hospital/physio sessions?

    I had foot surgery just over 4 months ago.
    I specifically asked at my last appointment (6 weeks post-op) when I could start using my cross trainer again and was told to try at the 3-and-a-half month stage but to be guided by pain.

    "Too much pain = you're overdoing it".

    Just looked at the documentation they gave me and it says "impact activities such as running/jogging/Zumba/aerobics are to be avoided for 3 months following bone surgery".

    I started on my cross trainer just over a week ago.
    I've found it has helped a lot.
    I think I 'learned a limp' after my surgery (2 weeks in a cast, 5 weeks in a boot) but 10 minutes (now increased to 20 minutes) per day has definitely helped the way I walk. My limp is now almost unnoticeable - in fact, I'm pretty sure that I'm the only person who notices.

    Of course, I'm concentrating purely on getting my foot back to normal rather than shifting weight/getting fit.

    If it were me, I wouldn't do any exercise involving my foot until I'd had personal advice about it.

    Are there exercises at the gym that would not involve using your feet?
    Maybe one of the trainers could advise.
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    I'm assuming you currently have no NHS rehab in place.


    You need to see a physio (or a podiatrist).


    Go to your GP and ask for a referral to a physio (or a podiatrist). Where I live it's possible to do a self-referral to see a NHS physio or I can get an appointment at my GP surgery. I can get an appointment within a week or ten days.


    The reason I mention a podiatrist is because it's your foot. The structure of your foot is extremely complicated and it's usually the only bit of your body supporting your weight during exercise. If you don't do the rehab properly you could cause longer term damage. You can be referred to a NHS podiatrist but waiting lists tend to be long. The alternative is to see one privately. But check their fees first.


    https://cop.org.uk/find-a-podiatrist/


    Don't do any weight bearing exercise until you've had professional advice (GP, physio or podiatrist).


    Swimming should give you some cardio exercise.
  • PollycatPollycat Forumite
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    Go to your GP and ask for a referral to a physio (or a podiatrist). Where I live it's possible to do a self-referral to see a NHS physio or I can get an appointment at my GP surgery. I can get an appointment within a week or ten days.


    The reason I mention a podiatrist is because it's your foot. The structure of your foot is extremely complicated and it's usually the only bit of your body supporting your weight during exercise. If you don't do the rehab properly you could cause longer term damage. You can be referred to a NHS podiatrist but waiting lists tend to be long. The alternative is to see one privately. But check their fees first.
    I was referred to NHS Podiatry through my GP.
    I cannot praise their care - ante, post and during the operation - highly enough.

    I'd say this would be a good route to take.
  • edited 26 July 2019 at 2:13PM
    Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    edited 26 July 2019 at 2:13PM
    You can't beat a good podiatrist.


    I used to do a lot of running and was constantly plagued with shin splints, knee pain, hip pain and lower back pain.


    A work colleague recommended a podiatrist and I saw him privately (although he was NHS too but the waiting list was way too long).


    I knew I had totally flat feet but he explained how that often had a knock on effect. He gave me some prescription orthotics (not cheap) but I've not had any more running injuries in 15 years. (He still refurbishes them for me when they get worn).


    EDIT: as a former NHS employee myself, it's disappointing that the OP hasn't had some kind of outpatient follow up arranged by the NHS. If I'd broken my foot I'd be demanding it.
  • stephen77stephen77 Forumite
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    Rye93 wrote: »
    H
    d. Would there be any machines at the gym for cardio better suited for me at the moment to help me ease in maybe?



    Thanks.

    Yes there are machines.
    Some gyms have an upside down bike, that you power with arms. Not sure what the kit is actually called. But if you seen it, you know what it is.

    Failing that.
    Machine chest press, seated pull downs, seated row machines with a chest pad.
    Go on these machines with light weight.
    Do 5 to 10 sets of 50 to 75 reps on each. Use a weight that gives you a good burn but stop before failure.
    This will burn a good amount of kcals and give you that exercise high.

    If you fancy it, you can do low reps and push to failure. eg 6 to 15 reps, do not worry about gaining too much muscle as you have to eats lots for this.
    But it will give a good exercise buzz.
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