New Post Advanced Search

Alternative accommodation and out of pocket costs.

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Flood & Storms Help & Information
2 replies 6.9K views
Fudgelet2222Fudgelet2222 Forumite
1 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Flood & Storms Help & Information
Hi.

Over 5 weeks ago now we had a flood under the floorboards. A loss adjuster was sent by the insurance and we’ve been put into alternative accommodation some 12 miles from home.

At first we were just grateful to be somewhere habitable and whilst we still are the travel costs are now adding up. We’ve asked the loss adjuster if we’re entitled to any fuel costs as we’re covering an extra 48 miles per day now to get the children to and from school. (We do two round trips a day.) we’ve been offered 10p a mile. Although it’s better than nothing it won’t go a huge way towards our fuel costs and we’ve been absorbing these costs in the short term, however no work has started and we’re fearing this could go on for many months to come.

My question is are we expecting too much to have all out fuel costs covered as the location of the accommodation is out of our control or should we be happy with this token sum of mileage or should we ask them if we can negotiate a slightly higher price. We don’t want to make a profit or have anything we’re not entitled to, we just don’t want to be out of pocket for too long as the money has got to come from somewhere so ultimately will effect our day to day quality of living. The insurance policy is very vague and just lists reasonable costs.

Replies

  • Rodders53Rodders53 Forumite
    900 posts
    Ninth Anniversary 500 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    10p is not enough IMHO... They should be paying for both the fuel and the additional wear and tear. Use https://www.mileiq.com/en-gb/blog/business-mileage-rates-uk/ as a guide when discussing this with your Insurers. (Other mileage rate guides may be out there, too).

    Consider advising your vehicle insurers of your temporary address and additional miles. Both may affect your premium.

    If the Insurers are also paying a daily 'disruption allowance' in addition to the accommodation, though, they may consider that covers some of the extra travel costs?

    Depending on what has happened at your home you'll likely find that nothing much will happen before a 'drying certificate' is issued. We had "an escape of water" that needed ceilings tearing down to find and fix the multiple leaks. We then had many weeks of industrial dehumidifiers running before it was dry enough to replace, plaster, redecorate and re-carpet. They use hour meters to recompense the electricity used.
  • edited 7 September 2019 at 11:45AM
    littlerocklittlerock Forumite
    1.8K posts
    1,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭
    edited 7 September 2019 at 11:45AM
    I have recently been in a similar situation.

    It seems that house buildings and contents insurance policies only specify what is covered. So a convention has arisen that the Buildings cover for Alternative Accommodation covers somewhere temporary to live and the Contents cover for Alternative Accommodation covers the related expenses and disruption expenses associated with this.

    New policies recognise this and make generous allowance for alternative accommodation so that you should be able to find somewhere similar locally and use the contents AA for associated expenses. As many rentals are unfurnished you can get a rental furniture pack as part of this.

    Not all policies have been updated to reflect this and some AA allowances are quite modest still. However unless you live somewhere very expensive or there is nowhere suitable locally and you are going to be out of your own house for a !long time, it should be sufficient for 6 months in most places.

    You need to discuss with your loss adjusters.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support