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Is there a bonafide way to stop cats and foxes coming into my garden?

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  • ed110220ed110220 Forumite
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    It's not inconsiderate of cat owners to let cats exhibit natural behaviours like roaming outside and hunting, the inconsideration is from people who expect the world to fit around them just so their garden is neater and tidier. Do you have a problem with the birds that invariably poo in your garden?

    You're complaining about foxes too, who's 'consideration' do you think would solve that one? The good news is that foxes generally don't like cats, so the cats might be helping you in that regard at least!

    If you have this much problem with wildlife, I'd suggest you'd be better of staying indoors.

    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people. Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently. Wild animals are different as no one owns them.

    As to keeping them out, I've heard stretching a wire above the top of a fence keeps them out if the correct height as they can't sit on the top of it.
  • StratusStratus Forumite
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    Tammykitty wrote: »
    You might find you suddenly get a rodent problem if all your neighbors got rid of the cats.


    I live in a rural area and a stream runs down the back of the houses on my lane, my neighbor hates cats but is still very grateful I have them as we don't have a rodent problem anymore due to them!

    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/
  • Ant555Ant555 Forumite
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    I had a problem with an animal (either cat or fox, never really worked out) using my front garden as a loo for a good while - really disgusting mess left regularly.

    I bought some cat repellent spray from Wilkos and it worked great, first application though was intensely smelly as, I think, it had garlic in it. As this was outside, it didnt really matter too much, I kept the spray bottle down the side of my house and gave the grass and the front paving stones a very quick spray every now and then - my thoughts were that their noses were far better than mine so a quick top up would be quite intense for them.

    As I said, this worked an absolute treat and it stopped very quickly HOWEVER, I dont think they sell it any more (certainly not the garlick-y one) but my recommendation would be to see if you can google and fins something similar.

    hope this helps.
  • TammykittyTammykitty Forumite
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    Stratus wrote: »
    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/


    Did you actually read your own link - they make limited impact on large rat populations in cities and prefer smaller prey (mice?)

    Also although the cats only killed 2 rats -
    "As the researchers report in their study, a one percent increase in the number of cats on a given day made it 100 times less likely that a rat would trigger the team’s motion-sensitive cameras"

    Therefore the presence of the cat changes a rats behavior as they stay away from the cat (and therefore out of your garden if the cat is in it!)


    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/cats-are-surprisingly-ineffective-keeping-urban-rat-populations-check-180970428/


    My cats have a mouse that I see about once a week and none of the houses have had a mouse problem since I got the cats - and there was mice problems previously.


    https://www.victorpest.com/articles/will-getting-a-cat-get-rid-of-mice


    Mice don't even like the smell of cats
  • Rusty_ShackletonRusty_Shackleton Forumite
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    JackeeBoy wrote: »
    Would you be so appalled if we were talking about mice, ants or cockroaches? No, you wouldn't.

    I absolutely would be appalled if anyone caused any of those animals a needless slow, painful death, and that's what rat poison would do an animal the size of a cat. You'd also be depriving someone of a loved pet. I take it from your callous attitude towards others' pets that you don't have pets of your own?
    wrote:
    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people.

    Yeah, cats have been in the UK for thousands of years and can survive quite happily in the wild. If everyone stopped having pet cats you'd still have an abundant cat population. Given the public's attitude towards fox hunting, I very much doubt you'd find much support for culling cats.

    I can understand if cats mess in your garden wanting to try methods to deter them, but no reasonable person would seriously consider causing them harm!
  • ariba10ariba10 Forumite
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    We have a dog and have no problem with cats coming in to the garden!
    I used to be indecisive but now I am not sure.
  • StratusStratus Forumite
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    If only cat owners would train their pets

    [IMG][/img]Trained-cat.png
  • Fire_FoxFire_Fox Forumite
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    JackeeBoy wrote: »
    It's one of the main things stopping me from enjoying my garden. It's now especially more disgusting now that I have artificial grass. I have tried using the sound blasters etc., but cats keep coming in and I swear then pick on my garden. I just wish owners were more considerate and kept their bloody pests inside.

    I have put spikes around on the fence and though it did initially deter them from using certain entry points, the always find a way around or just get used to it. What can I do?

    The only thing I can think of is getting very high fences (I can currently see over mine) and putting prison-style barbedwire all over.

    Perhaps the animals in question think plastic grass is disgusting, so are voting with their bums. :p

    There are recent threads on this topic if you run an advanced search. Spikes are intended for specific creatures - eg. human intruders/ pigeons - try a proper cat-proofing system.

    I don't see the logic of making antagonistic or inflammatory comments when you are seeking targeted advice. Many of the people who know most about keeping such animals in or out (same basic principle) are animal lovers themselves.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
  • Fire_FoxFire_Fox Forumite
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    ed110220 wrote: »
    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people. Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently. Wild animals are different as no one owns them.

    Plenty of domestic dogs cause problems: barking or whining, pooping in the street and parks, sheep worrying, killing fawns and other wildlife. Yet it remains socially acceptable to let them off the lead.

    Plenty of children screech and run riot on public transport, in shops and eateries, trespass and cause damage. Yet it remains socially acceptable to eschew contraception.

    Self centred and inconsiderate guardianship is not limited to pets. ;)
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
  • JackmydadJackmydad Forumite
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    Stratus wrote: »
    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/
    Tammykitty wrote: »
    Did you actually read your own link - they make limited impact on large rat populations in cities and prefer smaller prey (mice?)

    Also although the cats only killed 2 rats -
    "As the researchers report in their study, a one percent increase in the number of cats on a given day made it 100 times less likely that a rat would trigger the team’s motion-sensitive cameras"

    Therefore the presence of the cat changes a rats behavior as they stay away from the cat (and therefore out of your garden if the cat is in it!)


    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/cats-are-surprisingly-ineffective-keeping-urban-rat-populations-check-180970428/


    My cats have a mouse that I see about once a week and none of the houses have had a mouse problem since I got the cats - and there was mice problems previously.


    https://www.victorpest.com/articles/will-getting-a-cat-get-rid-of-mice


    Mice don't even like the smell of cats
    Not all cats will tackle a rat in my experience. They vary as hunters in general as well.
    We've had a couple who would take rats regularly, and bring them back dead, the one in particular would lay them out as grisly trophies. The others we've had didn't seem as interested, but would catch mice.
    Fortunately none of our cats have shown much interest in birds.
    Whatever the case, cats are part of the world we live in. If you don't want them in your garden, then do something to keep them out of it that doesn't cause them harm.
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