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Sheltered Housing Local Authority Criteria

edited 9 May 2019 at 9:05AM in Disability Money Matters
17 replies 2K views
Green_garnetGreen_garnet Forumite
57 posts
edited 9 May 2019 at 9:05AM in Disability Money Matters
I have heard something which does not sound quite right. Turned down for sheltered housing because mental health not taken into account - told others with physical disabilities will always have more points and priority. The person has disability benefits for mental health for many years.

Is it not the case that mental health is given the same 'status' (sorry if this is the wrong word) as other health criteria, such as physical disabilities?

If the information that 'mental health' not taken into account in the assessment is right enough it seems to put the elderly person with longstanding mental health at a disadvantage. There would be no prospect of getting suitable housing. The person cannot afford to sell and buy a suitable home as the present home, which has a low value, is unsuitable and not enough points were allocated to be close enough to be considered for Local Authority sheltered housing.

Thanks for any knowledge about this.

Green garnet
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Replies

  • cattiecattie Forumite
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    I think it could depend on which council as they all have different criteria. In my previous borough I know it was fairly normal to offer sheltered accomodation to those who had quite severe & enduring mental health problems, especially if they were in unsuitable accomodation or became homeless due to being in hospital for some time.
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  • That is helpful to know, thanks cattie. I thought there would be something consistent about treating people equally with either mental or physical health issues - and it would apply across all local authorities.

    It seemed strange to me that they would assess, exclude mental health and focus only on physical problems.

    Green garnet
  • GlasweJenGlasweJen Forumite
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    I think it would depend on what the sheltered housing is. In Glasgow some is for over 55s only and if you're young you're gubbed, some is zoned as mental health, some is wheelchair or other mobility aids users only, some is for learning disabilities etc. There's no point giving a bipolar 30 year old a ground floor wheelchair accessible flat in a retirement village is there?

    Has a needs assessment taken place?
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  • nicetomeetyounicetomeetyou Forumite
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    I know for my local authority to get sheltered housing when your under 55 years old you need either a psychical disability or a learning disability. Mental health isn't taken into account unless you have input from secondary mental health services, i.e. supporting letter from the CMHT.

    It's the same for bus passes here. If you have mental health issues / high functioning ASD and your not receiving support from social services or mental health psychiatric services you won't be entitled to a bus pass or it is harder to get a bus pass.
  • sherambersheramber Forumite
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    Why is the current house unsuitable?

    Could adaptions be made to make it suitable?
  • edited 9 May 2019 at 8:18PM
    Green_garnetGreen_garnet Forumite
    57 posts
    edited 9 May 2019 at 8:18PM
    Thanks for all the replies. Not sure what local criteria involve but elderly person struggling to cope alone at home. Mental health so Warden support wanted but physical adaptations to present accommodation not helpful as not needed.

    It seems housing staff said letter from a GP or Specialist would probably not help as no priority or consideration given for mental health needs. ? Needs assessment was only for physical needs so not appropriate - as far as I know.

    I thought it did not sound right but maybe their local policy is for physical disabilities. If so I thought that inequality would not be allowed.

    Green garnet
  • sherambersheramber Forumite
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    There are no resident wardens at the sheltered housing in my area. Due to costs they have been dispensed with.

    the occupants get a phone call at 9am asking if they are okay and that is it.
  • nicetomeetyounicetomeetyou Forumite
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    In my town they have different developments that cater for different needs. We housing with adaptations for people with limited mobility, we have flats for elderly with day room plus we have flats for people with learning disabilities and mental health difficulties with on-site warden. I live in supported housing that is run by a care company and since social services are moving towards direct payments a lot of our tenants are moving into council run sheltered housing and purchasing their own support with their care budget.
  • It sounds as if cutbacks are hard on everyone although nicetomeetyou #9 seems to show some still do provide much needed support.

    I wonder if anyone knows if it really is O.K. for a Local Authority to favour physical over mental health needs to the extent of excluding mental health from sheltered housing assessment. Thanks.

    Green garnet
  • edited 9 May 2019 at 9:43PM
    nicetomeetyounicetomeetyou Forumite
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    edited 9 May 2019 at 9:43PM
    I wonder if anyone knows if it really is O.K. for a Local Authority to favour physical over mental health needs to the extent of excluding mental health from sheltered housing assessment. Thanks.

    It shouldn't matter if you have a physical disability or learning/mental health disability. It used to go on if you received mid/high rate DLA you met the criteria for sheltered housing. Back in 2005 when I got my first bungalow on a sheltered housing area I met the criteria as I got high rate DLA for a learning disability. The council didn't do a in-depth assessment at all. This was before bidding for properties and I got offered a bungalow which I took (it was a mistake at the time as I was the youngest on the street by 30 years and I become isolated) I don't know if they operate the DLA criteria now but I should think they still do?

    Have you looked into housing association in your area.. They have properties / complex/flats/bungalows for people with disabilities. They might be more available than council properties.
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