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NHS Contract says Permanent but it should be FTC

Just a general query regarding NHS contracts.

I current work for a Social Enterprise that deliver NHS services - this is fixed term until March 2020.

However when I look at my contract (that i've signed) there is nothing on there that says it is fixed term and that I am classed as permanent.

I just wanted to ask whether this is a common thing with NHS contracts or have I got more job security than I thought?

Thank you :-)
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Replies

  • Sorry I think i've put this in the wrong section - my apologies.
  • Comms69Comms69 Forumite
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    You have exactly the same job security.


    There is no such thing as permanent.
  • Easy, they make a change not long after you start and say new contract here and apologies.

    Interviewed December 17 for FTC of 9 months duration for the new year - Start of the year as the old year became the new, it was plain someone in HR had forgotten this, as the contract produced days into new year became a FTC someone typed ending of 2019 in a contract, I never queried it, never took 2019 end date serious and just smiled to myself that someone must have thought they were still in 17 when they did this contract.

    A month into employment, I'm pulled into a meeting room when HR profusely apologised and presented me with a new contract so easily sorted and not binding. (even then they still got the month wrong lol) Perhaps you want to score some points in bringing up their error before they do :)
  • GlasweJenGlasweJen Forumite
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    In my area any job over 2 years is automatically permanent even if the intention is for a fixed term, at the end of the two years the person is redeployed or offered a redundancy. Weird but true. I don't know if it's unique to highlands or Scotland/U.K. wide
  • Andy_LAndy_L Forumite
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    on a FTC just before 2 year point they have to actively do something for you stay on or you're out. On permanent, just before the 2 year point they have to do something to kick you out or you stay.
    It's a bit like glass half full vs half empty,
  • Andy_LAndy_L Forumite
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    GlasweJen wrote: »
    In my area any job over 2 years is automatically permanent even if the intention is for a fixed term, at the end of the two years the person is redeployed or offered a redundancy. Weird but true. I don't know if it's unique to highlands or Scotland/U.K. wide

    The 2 year point is UK-wide employment law
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    Comms69 wrote: »
    You have exactly the same job security.


    There is no such thing as permanent.


    Exactly. I worked in the NHS for 25 years and I can't imagine any NHS trust including the word "permanent" in a contract of employment. If it's not a fixed term or bank or other form of temporary contract it is "substantive".


    I'm not clear why the OP thinks they have an NHS contract anyway. They seem to be saying they work for a social enterprise providing services to the NHS. Surely the contract is with the social enterprise, not the NHS.


    Or am I totally wrong?
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    GlasweJen wrote: »
    In my area any job over 2 years is automatically permanent even if the intention is for a fixed term, at the end of the two years the person is redeployed or offered a redundancy. Weird but true. I don't know if it's unique to highlands or Scotland/U.K. wide


    Hi GlasweJen


    Do NHS Scotland still use the term permanent? If I had £1 for every time I heard somebody told "there is no such thing as a permanent contract" I'd be a millionaire!


    (PS - nut having a go at you. I respect your posts and remember you've had loads of management problems at your trust - or whatever they are north of the border)
  • GlasweJenGlasweJen Forumite
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    Hi GlasweJen


    Do NHS Scotland still use the term permanent? If I had £1 for every time I heard somebody told "there is no such thing as a permanent contract" I'd be a millionaire!


    (PS - nut having a go at you. I respect your posts and remember you've had loads of management problems at your trust - or whatever they are north of the border)

    Interesting question, I have a substantive post but my contract does use the term permanent. I just checked my old contract from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and that used the term permanent but my husbands doctor contract uses the term "substantive" for both Highlands health board and NHS Lanarkshire. Obviously it's a throw back to the old days and no doubt the term will be replaced at some point.
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    GlasweJen wrote: »
    Interesting question, I have a substantive post but my contract does use the term permanent. I just checked my old contract from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and that used the term permanent but my husbands doctor contract uses the term "substantive" for both Highlands health board and NHS Lanarkshire. Obviously it's a throw back to the old days and no doubt the term will be replaced at some point.


    Yes. It's a bit of a hobby horse of mine. I've seen many disappointed NHS employees who thought they had a permanent (ie forever) contract only to find they can be sacked in the first two years for no reason at all or be made redundant.


    I don't think (I may be wrong) that the OP has an NHS contract anyway. They may have a contract with a poorly HR advised social provider, but not the NHS. (I retired six years ago so may be completely wrong),


    Otherwise employees of Serco, Capita, Initial etc would be NHS employees.
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