Dementia and door locking

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
26 replies 4.5K views
RambosmumRambosmum Forumite
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Is there a lock (for external door) available that cannot be deadbolted from the inside? As in, if you had a key, you could always get in but if you didn't have a key you couldn't?

Asking on behalf of someone with dementia - they have a habit of deadbolting the door which then restricts access to carers. The alternative is a care home as we aren't prepared to lock them in with no means of escape.

Currently 2 types of lock have been used - one a traditional key lock and this resulted in the key being kept in the back of the locked door and then one where the key wasn't needed to lock it from inside but they could twist a knob and then a key was again useless from the outside.

Thanks
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Replies

  • Ms_ChocaholicMs_Chocaholic Forumite
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    On our front door we have a thumbturn lock, turn it with a "knob" from the inside but you use a key to get in from the outside. I don't understand the lock you describe and how a key would not work from the outside.
    Thrifty Till 50 Then Spend Till the End
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  • 74jax74jax Forumite
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    What about a number pad. So it is always locked and a number is entered to gain access? No keys used or needed. Emergency services and doctors have the number on file etc.
    Forty and fabulous, well that's what my cards say....
  • GingernuttyGingernutty Forumite
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    There are locks which can prevent someone being locked in and locked out.

    Deadlocking can occur when a lock is 'set' from the inside and means anyone outside, even if they have a key, are effectively locked out.

    https://www.churchill.com/home-insurance/tips/door-lock-types
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  • izoomzoomizoomzoom Forumite
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    My Mom has dementia and lives with us.

    We have a door lock that from the inside, you can just open the door and get out. If you lock it with the key from either the inside or the outside, you cannot just open the door, you need to use the key to unlock it. You can never open the door from the outside to get inside, without using the key.

    Only hiccup is when the key has been left in the inside (whether locked or not), you cannot use a key on the outside to get in.
  • BrassicWomanBrassicWoman Forumite
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    second a keypad.
    2021 GC £1365.71/ £2400
  • RambosmumRambosmum Forumite
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    So if we had a key pad, could if be locked from the inside making the key pad unusable from the outside?
  • RambosmumRambosmum Forumite
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    On our front door we have a thumbturn lock, turn it with a "knob" from the inside but you use a key to get in from the outside. I don't understand the lock you describe and how a key would not work from the outside.

    So if you lock it on the inside using the thumb turn, can you still get in with a key from outside? As this is the current set up, but when locked from inside the key cannot be used outside but when not locked from the inside you still have to use a key outside.


    My issue with a key pad is that the resident will be unable to retain the number themselves meaning they lock themselves out when they go out.
  • theoreticatheoretica Forumite
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    Locks as you describe certainly exist, as I know doors with them. However, they may not meet the highest insurance standard and so home insurance will need checking or shopping around.
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  • elsienelsien Forumite
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    74jax wrote: »
    What about a number pad. So it is always locked and a number is entered to gain access? No keys used or needed. Emergency services and doctors have the number on file etc.

    If it's always locked then can the person still get out freely?
    Otherwise, aside from the safety issues, you're in deprivation of liberty territory.
    Plus, as Rambosmum says, what if the person forgets the number?

    Have you tried talking to a good independent locksmith for suggestions?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • greyteam1959greyteam1959 Forumite
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    @ Rambosmum
    'So if you lock it on the inside using the thumb turn, can you still get in with a key from outside? '
    Yes you can..............
    This is the product, there are various sizes chrome & brass effect.
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