Motor Insurance - scam?

Hi MSE, I recently received my motor insurance renewal documents from Direct Line and I happened to notice they have my occupation as "Professional Exc.Sport/Tv/Film" which I found surprising as I've never worked in those industries - it was also in quite small print.

I have, however, worked in the insurance industry and I've always understood any entertainment or sport related occupation carries higher premiums. Therefore, I would never have put this as my occupation - especially as I have always worked in IT.

After contacting Direct Line to correct this error, I was advised there would be no increase in my premium. I told them I was expecting a decrease, but the response was 'our system generated premium shows no difference'. I expect the story would be different if I was making the change the other way around.

The cynic in me thinks this is a deliberate act on the part of the insurer to subtly increase premiums, hoping customers won't notice. If this was a genuine mistake, why did it not default to either get DL Customer Service to contact me to confirm my occupation, or to an 'average' occupation and not one which carries a generally higher premium than most.

Needless to say, I am now investigating alternative providers, which is a shame as I have been a Direct Line customer for many years across various policies.
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Replies

  • ZorilloZorillo Forumite
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    Presumably Exc. means excluding?
  • rudekid48rudekid48 Forumite
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    Yet another scam thread with no scam.
    All matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.
  • So, not a scam at all then!
  • DCFC79DCFC79 Forumite
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    Hi MSE, I recently received my motor insurance renewal documents from Direct Line and I happened to notice they have my occupation as "Professional Exc.Sport/Tv/Film" which I found surprising as I've never worked in those industries - it was also in quite small print.

    I have, however, worked in the insurance industry and I've always understood any entertainment or sport related occupation carries higher premiums. Therefore, I would never have put this as my occupation - especially as I have always worked in IT.

    After contacting Direct Line to correct this error, I was advised there would be no increase in my premium. I told them I was expecting a decrease, but the response was 'our system generated premium shows no difference'. I expect the story would be different if I was making the change the other way around.

    The cynic in me thinks this is a deliberate act on the part of the insurer to subtly increase premiums, hoping customers won't notice. If this was a genuine mistake, why did it not default to either get DL Customer Service to contact me to confirm my occupation, or to an 'average' occupation and not one which carries a generally higher premium than most.

    Needless to say, I am now investigating alternative providers, which is a shame as I have been a Direct Line customer for many years across various policies.

    Is it possible you put the occupation as professional at some point ?
  • edited 18 August 2018 at 11:56AM
    DangermacDangermac Forumite
    557 Posts
    edited 18 August 2018 at 11:56AM
    Agreed. Professional sportspeople will tend to pay a higher premium. The wording which you have written states that you are not in this category, because presumably the 'Exc' means excluding professional sportspeople

    I note that you used to work in the insurance industry. I feel relieved that this is no longer the case

    If you have, indeed, got the wrong of the stick, you should post an apology. Pretty bad that you have stated that this is a scam when it's clearly nothing of the sort. As if a company like Direct Line would re-note their clients as being professional sportspeople to illicit a higher premium.

    Unbelievable post.

    DM
  • dunstonhdunstonh Forumite
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    Perhaps this is a fake post designed to make us laugh at the number of scams-thats-are-not-scam threads that have been occurring.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • rudekid48 wrote: »
    Yet another scam thread with no scam.


    Of course there is. The scam is that insurers will never reduce your premium for changes but will nearly always increase it.
  • Of course there is. The scam is that insurers will never reduce your premium for changes but will nearly always increase it.

    :wall:

    Even if that were true (which, demonstrably, it isn't) that still isn't a scam. Buy yourself a dictionary.
  • ValiantSon wrote: »
    :wall:

    Even if that were true (which, demonstrably, it isn't) that still isn't a scam. Buy yourself a dictionary.
    Scam: a dishonest scheme


    Well it is dishonest to not give a refund when it is due but charge extra every time they can.
  • Scam: a dishonest scheme


    Well it is dishonest to not give a refund when it is due but charge extra every time they can.

    :wall:

    You are talking utter garbage. Sorry, but you are.

    What on earth are you on about with regards to refunds? If you change the details of the insured risk then a new premium is calculated. The new premium may be higher, or lower, than the previous one. As an example, when I moved house a few years ago, my car insurance premium went down because my new address was considered to pose a lower risk. I got a refund for the difference over the remaining term of the policy. So, as I said, they do reduce premiums if the risk changes and it is more favourable.

    Furthermore, insurance is provided by private companies, who can charge whatever they want for the service. So if they decided that they weren't going to reduce premiums on existing policies they would be perfectly entitled to do so. They decide what constitutes risk. However, as I have already demonstrated, your contention that they don't reduce premiums is utter nonsense.


    Your definition of "scam" is also a bit woolly. Try this from Cambridge:
    an illegal plan for making money, especially one that involves tricking people

    Or this from Oxford:
    a dishonest scheme; a fraud

    Or this from Merriam-Webster:
    a fraudulent or deceptive act or operation

    Nothing you describe fits the definition of a scam, and you are also completely wrong that insurers don't reduce premiums if risk is reduced.

    You are wrong: just accept it.
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