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Learners waste £100,000s a year on driving tests they instantly fail - MSE News

in Motoring
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  • Car_54Car_54 Forumite
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    Stoke wrote: »
    When I took my test, I was told quite openly by my instructor that an examiner can reject a test if the test car (that for all intents and purposes appears to be working correctly), has an EML or other warning light illuminated. It's not as if this is secret information and with respect, these youngsters will be operating a dangerous piece of equipment if they pass their test. Do we want to give them free reign to take their cars out on the road, put other road users at risk, if they can't even prepare for a simple driving test correctly?
    In recent years the DVSA have adopted a more "common sense" approach to warning lights. Their current procedures say:

    "An engine MIL that doesn’t work or that shows there’s a malfunction is a major defect. If the MIL illuminates part way through a test and the vehicle appears to be performing normally with no obvious signs of malfunction, then the test should continue and the ADI or accompanying driver informed upon return.Many vehicles are fitted with warning lights to indicate that a service is due and so on. These warning lights are purely to remind the driver/ rider of the need to book their vehicle in for service and so on. Examiners must not terminate a test purely because this type of warning light is displayed.
    ABS Light: Examiners can make the decision not to take the test if it is on at the start of the test; however, if it comes on during the test they should continue."
  • StokeStoke Forumite
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    Car_54 wrote: »
    In recent years the DVSA have adopted a more "common sense" approach to warning lights. Their current procedures say:

    "An engine MIL that doesn’t work or that shows there’s a malfunction is a major defect. If the MIL illuminates part way through a test and the vehicle appears to be performing normally with no obvious signs of malfunction, then the test should continue and the ADI or accompanying driver informed upon return.Many vehicles are fitted with warning lights to indicate that a service is due and so on. These warning lights are purely to remind the driver/ rider of the need to book their vehicle in for service and so on. Examiners must not terminate a test purely because this type of warning light is displayed.
    ABS Light: Examiners can make the decision not to take the test if it is on at the start of the test; however, if it comes on during the test they should continue."
    Really? I don't think that is common sense at all. I've actually had an ABS system fail on me (without warning) while driving to work once and the pedal became hard and the brakes subsequently locked up when I had to slam my foot down and I ended up almost losing my back end. It's another system that when non-functional changes the dynamics of the car.

    The EML, fair enough.... You can get an EML for a partially failing lambda and yet the car will work absolutely perfectly.
  • Car_54Car_54 Forumite
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    Stoke wrote: »
    Really? I don't think that is common sense at all. I've actually had an ABS system fail on me (without warning) while driving to work once and the pedal became hard and the brakes subsequently locked up when I had to slam my foot down and I ended up almost losing my back end. It's another system that when non-functional changes the dynamics of the car.


    That doesn't sound like an ABS failure.
  • EctophileEctophile Forumite
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    Stoke wrote: »
    Really? Surely it's obvious? Having a space saver wheel fitted to the car makes it 'unfit for purpose', as it is unable to perform at the normal operating specifications. Personally, I think space savers are dangerous and should be banned. Either a can of foam should be included, or a proper full size wheel. Space savers change the dynamics and handling of a vehicle, quite drastically. Drivers are often too stupid or incapable of adapting their driving techniques to suit. My old VW Lupo had a full size wheel and it was ideal.


    Personally, I would rather have a space saver wheel on the car. It doesn't make sense to me to take a tyre that you know is damaged, and then pump it up to some unknown pressure using a can of foam.


    I have driven around on a space saver. It makes little difference to the handling if driven sensibly. And with a speed limit of 50MPH, you shouldn't be driving round like a hooligan anyway.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • StokeStoke Forumite
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    Ectophile wrote: »
    Personally, I would rather have a space saver wheel on the car. It doesn't make sense to me to take a tyre that you know is damaged, and then pump it up to some unknown pressure using a can of foam.


    I have driven around on a space saver. It makes little difference to the handling if driven sensibly. And with a speed limit of 50MPH, you shouldn't be driving round like a hooligan anyway.

    I also think cars should be equipped with a 12v air compressor.
  • gpc273gpc273 Forumite
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    The title of this thread is misleading, candidates aren't failing their test, the test is being terminated for reasons out with an actual test fail.

    Its an important distinction as if you fail a driving test you can't have another test for 10 working days, but termination for an unroadworthy vehicle means that rule is suspended and providing you can find another test slot you could have another test, once fee's are paid, as soon as possible.


    I prefer a space saver over the foam option simply because some tyre failures won't be resealable.
  • RetrogamerRetrogamer Forumite
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    My brother managed to pass his driving test last year with a total of 2 driving lessons at the age of 24 and with a piece of electrical tape covering the airbag warning light on the dash (not as bad as it sounds!)

    He bought his own cheap car (£150) to get driving experience in whilst myself or his friends sat beside him.

    Doesn't get much cheaper than that i guess, insurance costs aside.
    All your base are belong to us.
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