MSE News: 5p bag charge to include smaller stores

edited 12 January 2018 at 4:50PM in Food Shopping & Groceries
23 replies 4.6K views
MSE_CallumMSE_Callum Forumite
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edited 12 January 2018 at 4:50PM in Food Shopping & Groceries
The 5p carrier bag charge is set to be extended to smaller stores under plans to tackle a 'throwaway culture' in a 25-year environment plan being published later this week...
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'5p bag charge to include smaller stores'
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  • aj23_2aj23_2 Forumite
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    Just ban them completely. I use fabric eco-bags.
  • redfoxredfox Forumite, Board Guide
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    aj23 wrote: »
    Just ban them completely. I use fabric eco-bags.

    I completely agree. There should be no need for the 'one use' bags if everybody accepted that we are strangling the planet with plastic and took their own bags when shopping.

    There are plenty of fold up ones that you can slip in your pocket if carrying them around is an issue.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Quick Grabbit, Food Shopping & Groceries and Shop but don't drop boards which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to [email protected] (it's not part of my role to deal with this) Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

  • aj23_2aj23_2 Forumite
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    redfox wrote: »
    I completely agree. There should be no need for the 'one use' bags if everybody accepted that we are strangling the planet with plastic and took their own bags when shopping.

    There are plenty of fold up ones that you can slip in your pocket if carrying them around is an issue.

    Even when I was at school, I'd re-use plastic bags for football boots/rugby boots, taking extra stuff in with me etc.

    But better off without them. Even brown paper bags like in the US would be better than the plastic.
  • edited 11 January 2018 at 1:03PM
    KxMxKxMx Forumite
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    edited 11 January 2018 at 1:03PM
    Paper bags cannot be re-used as much as plastic, recycling can be compromised because of mixed materials (glue, handles) and they produce harmful gases during production and decomposition.

    While they don't get ingested by or strangle wildlife they are not some ideal green alternative to plastic.
  • MSE_TonyMSE_Tony MSE Staff
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    Sadly the 5p charge in more stores is not really going to put shoppers off and agree it would be a good idea to get rid of them (or replace for paper bags).

    As that is not going to happen, the charge per bag should be increased and maybe introduce a scheme to return carrier bags (bit like returning glass bottles in years gone by) where you get rewarded ie: a couple of pence, 5p or 10p per bag in the form of a shopping voucher.

    I am sure the youngsters would be up for that and likely to pick a bag up in the the street if they spotted one blowing around.
  • Nick_CNick_C Forumite
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    aj23 wrote: »
    Even brown paper bags like in the US would be better than the plastic.

    That depends on what your criteria are.

    Paper bags use more energy to manufacture and transport than plastic ones.

    Supermarket paper bags tend to be single use, whereas plastic bags can be reduced as bin liners.

    Paper bags sent to landfill will biodegrade anaerobically, producing methane, which is four times more damaging to the atmosphere than CO2.

    If plastic bags are disposed of properly, they are better than paper.

    And the amount of plastic in "single use" carrier bags is miniscule, compared to the amount of plastic packaging used by supermarkets.
  • Nick_CNick_C Forumite
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    This is a duplicate thread.

    See http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5772832

    Shouldn't have been started. Should be merged.
  • aj23_2aj23_2 Forumite
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    Nick_C wrote: »
    That depends on what your criteria are.

    Paper bags use more energy to manufacture and transport than plastic ones.

    Supermarket paper bags tend to be single use, whereas plastic bags can be reduced as bin liners.

    Paper bags sent to landfill will biodegrade anaerobically, producing methane, which is four times more damaging to the atmosphere than CO2.

    If plastic bags are disposed of properly, they are better than paper.

    And the amount of plastic in "single use" carrier bags is miniscule, compared to the amount of plastic packaging used by supermarkets.

    But we're not allowed to use plastic bags as bin liners, haven't done for years. Dustmen won't take it.

    I've always said charging 5p for a bag is counterproductive when you're putting so much plastic packaging in the bag.
  • Nick_CNick_C Forumite
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    aj23 wrote: »
    But we're not allowed to use plastic bags as bin liners, haven't done for years. Dustmen won't take it.

    I've always said charging 5p for a bag is counterproductive when you're putting so much plastic packaging in the bag.

    You can't normally put your mixed recycling inside a plastic bag, but I've never heard of a council that says you can't put plastic bags into your residual waste.

    Which council is it?
  • Robin9Robin9 Forumite
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    MSE_Tony wrote: »
    (bit like returning glass bottles in years gone by) .


    I can remember the days when we returned the empties but I wonder how it could work today. Then the deliveries from Corona were on Corona's lorry in a wooden crate, the driver was employed by Corona and all came direct from the factory and the empties went back to the same factory.

    Today the transport industry is centered around deliveries (on shrink wrapped pallets - none of which is intended for reuse) from factories to a central hub and then mixed loads to supermarkets with no facility to take empties back.

    So all the supermarkets could do is to collect the empties and crush them and then send to a processing plant.
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