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Where can I find fire resistant MDF

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magn8pmagn8p Forumite
257 posts
Hi there,

I live in an old house where we have a chimney breast with an unused fireplace. I would like improve/open the fireplace and install a hole in the wall fireplace like this one - http://amzn.to/2xCS2lX

I spoke to a carpenter who has agreed to take the job and gave me list of shopping items which included fire resistant MDF with which he wishes to make a casing for the fire.

After searching Amazon.co.uk, Wickes, B&Q sites I could only find moisture resistant MDF like http://amzn.to/2zUbnjq but not fire resistant/retardant MDF.

I was wondering one of you could help me with finding one?

Mags.
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Replies

  • spadooshspadoosh Forumite
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    http://www.builderdepot.co.uk/mdf-medium-density-fibre-board-fire-rated-12mm-x-1220mm-x-2440mm.html


    Might be easier looking for Red MDF. Doubt youll find it in the retail DIY shops. Builder merchants and timber specialist, ring before turning up to save wasting your journey.
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 posts
    Thanks a ton!
  • FurtsFurts Forumite
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    Be careful here, and check out the fire manufacturers requirements. Remember fire retardant mdf is not fireproof, so think about how you intend using it.
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 posts
    Thank you. As mentioned above, he would like to simply make a casing to protect the fire from anything that falls from the chimney - mostly dust and old suit.

    Do you have a better material in your mind that you think is more suitable for this job?
  • GloomendoomGloomendoom Forumite
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    Steel plate?
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
  • societys_childsocietys_child Forumite
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    mostly dust and old suit
    Would that be Santa's suit? :)
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 posts
    Would that be Santa's suit? :)


    ha ha...Of course I meant soot. I can now blame my auto correction - how convenient! ;-)
  • magn8p wrote: »
    Thank you. As mentioned above, he would like to simply make a casing to protect the fire from anything that falls from the chimney - mostly dust and old suit.

    Do you have a better material in your mind that you think is more suitable for this job?

    99% sure that what you are planning to do won't comply with either regs or manufacturers instructions.

    What you want to do is cut the hole in the chimney breast finish the front to the size required by the manufacturers and probably drop a liner down the chimney, or at the very least, fit a blanking plate over the opening with a flue through it.
    Check the fitting instructions
    The way to stop soot falling down is to get the chimney swept before fitting the fire.
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 posts
    Thanks for that Chappers.

    Just to be clear I intend to fit an electric fire. Here are the make and model details - http://www.stovax.com/stove-fire/radiance-inset-electric-fires/radiance-inset-edge/

    The instructions don't say anything about fitting a flue - so do you reckon we still need one?

    I have one more question for you - in order to open up the fire place the builder may have to cut the existing lintel, is fitting a new lintel a must before fitting the fire place? Please share any regulations that deal with it.
  • FreeBearFreeBear Forumite
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    magn8p wrote: »
    in order to open up the fire place the builder may have to cut the existing lintel, is fitting a new lintel a must before fitting the fire place?

    You (or rather, the fitter) can not just remove the lintel unless a new one is installed a little higher. As the existing lintel is an integral & structural component of the house, it should in all probability require building control involvement.

    As for flue and suitable materials, I refer you to the installation instructions - www.stovax.com/download/Technical%20Documents/2.%20Fires/Built%20In%20&%20Wall%20Mounted%20Fires/Electric/Radiance/English/Radiance%20Inset%20Installation%20&%20User%20Instructions.pdf
    The heater should ideally be fitted into/onto an internal flat wall constructed from either studwork and plasterboard block/brick. The fixings provided are for use on brick walls ONLY. Please ensure that suitable fixings are used when securing to any hollow or purpose built cavity.

    NOTE: This appliance is not suitable for fitting to a Cavity Wall, backing on to an outside wall, an open chimney or any opening that may be subject to damp and draft, unless adequate precautions are taken to avoid the appliance coming into contact with moisture or excessive drafts. In such installations, any existing chimney and/or purpose provided air vents should be fully sealed.

    No need to use fire resistant MDF - It appears that plasterboard is sufficient. If I were doing it, I think I'd use Hardiebacker cement board in the immediate vicinity of the fire.

    And no, you won't need a flue. The existing chimney will need sealing though.
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