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Lightweight Tiled conservatory roof. Yes or No

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in In my home (includes DIY) MoneySaving
18 replies 49.8K views
Savvy_amateurSavvy_amateur Forumite
77 Posts
I wonder if any of you have replaced your polycarbonate conservatory roof with one of the lightweight tiled options. I only seem to be able to find reports from a couple of years ago. Do they need building regulations how much do they cost and are they worth doing?
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  • DoozergirlDoozergirl Forumite
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    They don't comply with building regulations.

    They don't need to because conservatories are classed as outbuildings. The upshot of that is that these people can sell you anything at any price and make you believe you're buying something good because no one will check.

    I would not spend a considerable sum of money pretending that a conservatory is an extension when most elements are substandard and it will not add value to the house when it is put to the scrutiny of a conveyacing solicitor. The cost of a conservatory plus roof must be approaching the cost of a proper extension.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
  • GangaGanga Forumite
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    Doozergirl wrote: »
    They don't comply with building regulations.

    They don't need to because conservatories are classed as outbuildings. The upshot of that is that these people can sell you anything at any price and make you believe you're buying something good because no one will check.

    I would not spend a considerable sum of money pretending that a conservatory is an extension when most elements are substandard and it will not add value to the house when it is put to the scrutiny of a conveyacing solicitor. The cost of a conservatory plus roof must be approaching the cost of a proper extension.

    The problem is people who have had a conservatory built did not expect that they would have to fit a new roof later ( my neighbor is an example )
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
  • Alter_egoAlter_ego Forumite
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    A conservatory has a transparent roof.
    Without it's not a conservatory
    I am not a cat (But my friend is)
  • ComicGeekComicGeek Forumite
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    See this link, which confirms the LABC's guidance on this https://www.labc.co.uk/guidance/resource-library/technical-guide-solid-roofs-conservatories-or-porches-0
    The conservatory is no longer exempt under Building Regs if the proportion of glazing is reduced.
  • Thank you everyone for your replies. To my amazement my husband is still keen to chance it. I however I'm not as I think it is too much to spend when there is a chance we could be made to remove it. So the next question is does anyone know of any sort of treatment that could be applied to the roof to reduce heat loss that does not contravene building regs?
  • martinsurreymartinsurrey Forumite
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    Thank you everyone for your replies. To my amazement my husband is still keen to chance it. I however I'm not as I think it is too much to spend when there is a chance we could be made to remove it. So the next question is does anyone know of any sort of treatment that could be applied to the roof to reduce heat loss that does not contravene building regs?

    Really really expensive Scandinavian triple glazed super glass. Almost everything else is snake oil.

    Only way to keep it glass and reduce heat loss, but it would be cheaper to knock it down and do a proper extension.
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 Posts
    I second Doozergirl and others - tiles will only make a conservatory look like an extension. I recently purchased a house and a lot of sellers take that risk. They also have their central heating extended to the conservatory and in some cases remove the french doors that separate the conservatory from the living room.

    With regards to the improving heat retention - I can't think of any better solution but to replace your polycarbonate roof with a glass roof with a good u value like this one - http://www.conservatory-glass.com/product-options/thermal-insulation/natura/
  • magn8pmagn8p Forumite
    257 Posts
    The other suggestion is to have underfloor heating like http://amzn.to/2zlkwFD instead of heating the conservatory using a radiator that's probably tucked in a corner.

    This may not improve heat retention but will definitely even heat the room making it feel relatively more warmer.
  • DominicHDominicH Forumite
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    It doesn't contravene building regulations. The issue is that the no-longer-a-conservatory has to comply with building regulations. For example, the structure may need to be strengthened in order to support the new roof. Or not. It depends on what inspectors/surveyors say. If approved, they can't then make you take it down.
    If you put it up without telling building control, then yes, that would be reckless.
    "Einstein never said most of the things attributed to him" - Mark Twain
  • In the end I called the council building regulation department to discuss it with them and they were quite happy for it to go ahead they said they would charge £175 for the building regulations bit
This discussion has been closed.