Raspberry canes advice please!

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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FlossFloss Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
We have 2 areas of autum raspberry canes on our allotment, which DH has mulched with wood chippings. They have never been fed in the 5 years we have had the plot and are in a quandary about how & when to do it.

DH reckons manuring them will encourage his smothered weeds to grow back... I agree but can't come up with another plan.

There are approx 12-15 clumps of canes in each patch, all well established but in need of a little TLC. Any ideas?

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  • FarwayFarway Forumite
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    If the crops are good, why feed the brutes?
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    Floss wrote: »
    We have 2 areas of autum raspberry canes on our allotment, which DH has mulched with wood chippings. They have never been fed in the 5 years we have had the plot and are in a quandary about how & when to do it.

    DH reckons manuring them will encourage his smothered weeds to grow back... I agree but can't come up with another plan.

    There are approx 12-15 clumps of canes in each patch, all well established but in need of a little TLC. Any ideas?

    If you think they need some help, pull back the chippings with a rake, put on a layer of compost/manure or scatter fertilizer pellets and pull the wood chippings back over the area.

    If your compost has been made properly, it shouldn't have any viable weed seeds in it.
  • FlossFloss Forumite
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    Thanks for that - the manure is from local horse & donkey stables and is well rotted down, rather than compost from the daleks (which goes onto my veggie beds).
  • madjackslammadjackslam Forumite
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    My understanding is that raspberries like being fed. I have noticed a big increase in cropping since I started feeding and mulching. Incidentally, I know it's not what you're supposed to do, but I leave my autumn raspberry canes on for a second season. I find I get a good crop from them around July. Then I prune them out, and the new canes from this year are giving me a crop now.
  • FlossFloss Forumite
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    Thanks for that - unfortunately I cut them all down yesterday as it has been very wet with dank days here so fruit were rotting before getting ripe.

    The mulch seems to have helped with cropping this year, as well as weed smothering so with feeding i should be able to get a double crop in future years.
  • sam.4000sam.4000 Forumite
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    My understanding is that raspberries like being fed. I have noticed a big increase in cropping since I started feeding and mulching. Incidentally, I know it's not what you're supposed to do, but I leave my autumn raspberry canes on for a second season. I find I get a good crop from them around July. Then I prune them out, and the new canes from this year are giving me a crop now.

    I do that, my dad thinks I bonkers but with a small back garden I have very limited space.
  • A great organic, liquid feed: comfrey tea. To make: chop comfrey leaves and leave submerged in water. It's best feeding with the liquid feed when they flower. This avoids having to move the woodchip mulch back.

    It's definitely worth feeding raspberries, you get more fruit and of better quality.
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