Holiday destinations for less mobile.

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
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Newly_retiredNewly_retired Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
Unusual topic for this board, I know, but I hope for some useful ideas.
DH is not disabled, as such, and does not have a Blue Badge, but has mobility issues, because of back pain and angina, and cannot manage hills.

Trying to plan a holiday he can enjoy, but many scenic places are hilly. Lovely seaside places have limited parking, or car parks at the top of a hill, eg many Cornish villages, Robin Hoods Bay in Yorkshire and are therefore inaccessible.

So I am looking for recommendations for scenic areas with some facilities within walking distance but generally good parking, preferably near the coast.

Many thanks in advance.

Replies

  • poppy12345poppy12345 Forumite
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    Unusual topic for this board, I know, but I hope for some useful ideas.
    DH is not disabled, as such, and does not have a Blue Badge, but has mobility issues, because of back pain and angina, and cannot manage hills.

    Trying to plan a holiday he can enjoy, but many scenic places are hilly. Lovely seaside places have limited parking, or car parks at the top of a hill, eg many Cornish villages, Robin Hoods Bay in Yorkshire and are therefore inaccessible.

    So I am looking for recommendations for scenic areas with some facilities within walking distance but generally good parking, preferably near the coast.

    Many thanks in advance.
    I can't help with holiday destinations but you may find that most parking in any coastal destination extremely difficult without a Blue badge. Most places are generally taken very quickly. Have you thought of hiring a mobility scooter or even buying a 2nd hand one to take with you? They're not that expensive 2nd hand. This would make going out easier and parking further away you'd have more chance of spaces.
  • IAmWalesIAmWales Forumite
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    Hunstanton, Skegness (outside main season when it gets all chavtastic), Mablethorpe, Chapel St Leonards.

    For the winter, Donna Nook has an accessible path (and hundreds of seals!), and you can stop in Louth for fish and chips on the way back. A lovely little town with decent parking and all on the flat.
  • 50Twuncle50Twuncle Forumite
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    I was wondering a similar thing ?
    Do any cruises accept mobility scooters for getting around the ships and then there are potential charging problems ?
  • pjranpjran Forumite
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    50Twuncle wrote: »
    I was wondering a similar thing ?
    Do any cruises accept mobility scooters for getting around the ships and then there are potential charging problems ?

    If you take a motorised scooter you have to book an accessible cabin which are usually booked a long time in advance of sailing. However if you take a collapsible manual wheelchair you can book any cabin, just let them know in advance as you must complete a simple form before embarking.

    I can recommend Cunard and Celebrity cruise lines. The two Princess ships I’ve been on were a little older and had lots of heavy doorways to negotiate and I recently visited an Azamara ship which wasn’t wheelchair friendly.

    Last weekend I went to a posh English hotel and was treated like a second class citizen!!! Beautiful grounds but not accessible for wheelchair users and shown to an empty room for breakfast. Totally unacceptable. I cried. My poor husband had to take me outside and negotiate a shingle pathway to get to the rear of hotel, fortunately it had stopped raining, just to go in the dining room.

    Enjoy your holiday wherever you go.
  • OneYorkshireLassOneYorkshireLass Forumite
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    There's a corner of Wales that has flat areas in the town/village centres ...

    Porthmadog - the high street is flat and you can visit the harbour and tourist train stations.

    Just around the corner (over a hill, so need to drive) is Borth-Y-Gest - lovely small cove which is flat (car park/on street parking), nice views, a tea room ...

    Just around the next corner is Black Rock Sands - very long beach that's very flat and you can drive on it (for a charge).

    A few miles away is Criccieth - again the high street is flat, then there's a slope down to the sea front (would have to change car parks), but then there's a long length of esplanade to walk along which is flat and plenty of parking places. Nice cafes/restaurants/scenic.

    Further down the coast is Aberdaron, which has a very slight incline from the car park (it's over a little bridge), but apart from that it's fairly level with a nice beach (can't drive on that one though). Cute little tea rooms/pub.

    Over on Anglesey there's Beaumaris which is pretty flat with plenty of parking.

    In that area you can get away without walking up too many inclines and just look at the mountainous scenery from the car.

    I hear Norfolk is pretty flat too ...
  • Newly_retiredNewly_retired Forumite
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    Very helpful, oneYorkshirelass.
    Thanks for all replies.
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