Towering Leylandii

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
8 replies 1.6K views
dihilldihill Forumite
3 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
My neighbour has a Leylandii at the bottom of his garden, very close to my fence, that is taller than our house. I have asked him, and the previous owners (his parents) nicely 5 times in the last 5 years or so if they will have it trimmed as it blocks light and I am very worried about root damage - it is only a small garden. Each time they have said that they are on with it but nothing has happened. My neighbour seems to think it is funny and shouldn't be an issue. He also asked if I would pay for half of the cost of having it chopped down. I can't afford this. I have now written a polite letter asking for action. Is there anything else that I can or should do? Thanks in advance

Replies

  • FarwayFarway Forumite
    10.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you want to you can take legal action, or the council may. But this will obviously sour relations between you, and could adversely impact on selling your house should you ever want to

    Personally I would take up their offer of going halves on chopping them down, I know you say you can't afford it but only you can weigh up the cost against impact on your life & light

    Roots are not likely to be a problem, conifer roots do not wander wide or deep
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
    34.6K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Farway wrote: »
    If you want to you can take legal action, or the council may.

    I don't think you can take any action over one tree. You can if there is a hedge (two or more trees).
  • GangaGanga Forumite
    3.1K Posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    Farway wrote: »
    If you want to you can take legal action, or the council may. But this will obviously sour relations between you, and could adversely impact on selling your house should you ever want to

    Personally I would take up their offer of going halves on chopping them down, I know you say you can't afford it but only you can weigh up the cost against impact on your life & light

    Roots are not likely to be a problem, conifer roots do not wander wide or deep


    There was a program on the tv about the plague/problem that these trees were causing,it mainly involved disputes between neighbors,but one chap showed the tv company how the roots of next doors trees were drying his land up and causing damage to the foundations of his house:eek:
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
  • GloomendoomGloomendoom Forumite
    16.5K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I had a massive one at the end of my garden. The roots destabilised a two foot thick stone wall to such an extent, the wall had to be demolished.

    The tree is history too now.
  • badmemorybadmemory Forumite
    4.4K Posts
    Fifth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    Farway wrote: »
    If you want to you can take legal action, or the council may. But this will obviously sour relations between you, and could adversely impact on selling your house should you ever want to

    Personally I would take up their offer of going halves on chopping them down, I know you say you can't afford it but only you can weigh up the cost against impact on your life & light

    Roots are not likely to be a problem, conifer roots do not wander wide or deep

    Actually these roots do pose a problem just because they are not wide or deep. In a storm a couple of years ago one round here came down & blocked 3 front doors. How it didn't demolish the porches I don't know. Luckily seeing that was enough to persuade another neighbour that his 3 would probably demolish his house if they fell in the wrong direction. They look lovely when young but over 30 years later are an absolute nightmare.
  • Debbie_SavardDebbie_Savard Forumite
    430 Posts
    ✭✭
    >He also asked if I would pay for half of the cost of having it chopped down. I can't afford this<

    Do you know how much he's been quoted? TBH, assuming you are an owner/occupier, the benefits of removing it on house value and without registering a dispute could outweigh the cost of a £200 unsecured loan.

    h..p://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=897775
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
    34.7K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    If the tree isn't bothering your neighbour, then from his purely selfish point of view, it's only 'fair' that you contribute half the cost of its removal.

    If you can't afford it, neither will he. The poster above may be a newbie, but she has it nailed.
    People who don't stand for something will fall for anything.
  • andrewf75andrewf75 Forumite
    10.4K Posts
    10,000 Posts Seventh Anniversary
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    yes if you want it removed then of course you should offer to pay half the cost. Can't be that much surely?
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Lloyds Bank wrongly declares customer dead

Account was closed due to a misreading

MSE News

Cheap home insurance

Grab 100+ buildings insurance quotes & cashback

MSE Guides

£12 for 1L Baileys

Available at Tesco, Morrisons & Asda

MSE Deals