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Safety socket covers - UNSAFE

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  • RedFraggleRedFraggle Forumite
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    YES
    I was told that unlike modern systems my does not have individual circuit breakers?

    That is your fuseboard, nothing to do with sockets, it means you don't have individual trip switches on your fueboard for different elements of your domestic electrics.

    Instead of banning these covers I think they should should set up a safety standard they need to comply to.

    Because of how they work that isn't an option really. Anything that is capable of being inserted incorrectly depressing the safety cut off in the top pin hole is unsafe. They ae also completely unnecessary to begin with..

    Hope that helps and you feel a bit safer
    Officially in a clique of idiots
  • NO
    Completely unnecessary and potentially lethal though the testing done with some of the better ones makes it seem like they would have defeated the safety gates anyway. UK sockets are inherently safe, so much so that when I was about five the only way my mother could get her hairdryer (cord had gotten chewed up or something) to work was to wrap unshielded wire around the L and N pin of a nearby plug then plug that in, jamming the wires in wasn't an option.

    I don't see out being a government issue however, the UK is too much of a nanny state to begin with and they can too many things, switching to a 120v system would make things much safer as the sine wave created by our AC current at 240v is almost perfect for stopping a heart, the 120v system uses a different voltage and the hz of the system is different too. What would be a fatal shock here would (usually) be a very uncomfortable zap there.

    If the government really want to stick their noses into the matter then ban them in public buildings.
  • anotheruseranotheruser Forumite
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    NO
    So perhaps this thread should be unstickied as suggesting something is dangerous, when there's no evidence, at best misplace trust in a website that prides itself on telling the truth and builds trust.
  • BigglesBiggles Forumite
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    YES
    So perhaps this thread should be unstickied as suggesting something is dangerous, when there's no evidence, at best misplace trust in a website that prides itself on telling the truth and builds trust.
    As you know, I disagree with your views on 'safety' socket covers, but agree that there's little point in keeping this as a Sticky.

    MSE should take up the issue itself and make a cause of it or leave it alone altogether.
  • I just put a load of these about our new house.

    Are they really that bad? These are the ones I bought:

    amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00O7RRUKK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    The website looks terrible and I'm not sure if this is a hoax.

    I've never heard of anyone putting a cover in upside down?

    fatallyflawed.org.uk/assets/images/Lyvia_S.jpg

    Can't tell if this is a prank website?
  • Owain_MoneysaverOwain_Moneysaver Forumite
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    YES
    switching to a 120v system would make things much safer as the sine wave created by our AC current at 240v is almost perfect for stopping a heart, the 120v system uses a different voltage and the hz of the system is different too. What would be a fatal shock here would (usually) be a very uncomfortable zap there.

    Not necessarily so, the higher voltage causes a greater fault current to flow, and so the protective device operates more quickly.

    There are many other considerations too.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
  • baldelectricianbaldelectrician Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
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    YES
    I just put a load of these about our new house.

    Are they really that bad? These are the ones I bought:

    amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00O7RRUKK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    The website looks terrible and I'm not sure if this is a hoax.

    I've never heard of anyone putting a cover in upside down?

    fatallyflawed.org.uk/assets/images/Lyvia_S.jpg

    Can't tell if this is a prank website?

    http://www.beama.org.uk/resourceLibrary/beama-position-paper-on-socket-outlet-covers.html


    The BEMA site is the trade body of the socket manufacturers, the other links are genuine as well.
    baldly going on...
  • NO
    So perhaps this thread should be unstickied as suggesting something is dangerous, when there's no evidence, at best misplace trust in a website that prides itself on telling the truth and builds trust.

    Agree - I can't think of any reason at all why this post would be sticky. Even if there was solid evidence suggesting these were unsafe, it's still not important enough to be sticky surely? There are many dangers in the home, and most moreso than this.
  • Blackbeard_of_PerranporthBlackbeard_of_Perranporth Forumite
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    Cardiac Arrest - Electrical - Patient unconscious! Heart Attack - Plumbing - Patient conscious!
    Defibrillators Cannot Cure a Heart Attack!
  • I remember being a kid and sticking them in upside down, it does happen, and frequently! Although I was never electrocuted it was appealing to flick the switches (they made a noise) and I found it fun that I could change the socket cover to being upside down! I will never use them in my house, and I will also say that my daughter never goes near our switches, simply because we don’t draw attention to them so she’s not bothered by them.

    Socket covers just draw attention to the plug sockets, it turns something fairly boring into a game.

    Not to mention the fact that socket covers actually damage the socket because they are made too big to remove easily, effectively causing strain on the socket itself.
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