Dismissed at work due to mental health- Advise please!

Brand new to this so please bare with me..
Today I got dismissed from my job. It was to do with my attendance and that I'd been off 4 separate times since July 2016 (3 related and 1 not).
In August 2016, my mental health started to dip (depression, anger issues etc). I'd always been aware of my mental health but never felt the need to have time off or ask for help (the scariest part about it). I felt very anxious at work and asked to go home. The next day, I completed a return to work and because I was brand new, was put on an attendance watch (no sick days for 6 months) which I understood and accepted.
In Sept 2016, there was an incident at home in which my lashed out and ended up hurting my hand. The next day at work I was unable to use the keyboard so I sought help from first aid who advised I go to a walk in centre to get it checked out. I was advised by the walk in centre to rest the rest of the day. As this was in the morning, I'd only completed a short amount of my day at work so this classed as a full day off.
In December 2016, a completely unrelated day off. I had a blood test in the morning, passed out and was sick in the GP. I was told by the nurse to take the day off.
This day off triggered a hearing in which I was given a final written warning and it reset the no sick days for 6 months.
(I hope you're still with me because here comes the juicy part)
In March 207, my mental health dipped to the lowest it's ever been. Another incident at home caused me to once again lash out, but this time I punched a window, smashed it and hurt my hand (again). The night it happened, my head wasn't with it anymore and I needed help. The Monday of that week I called work to advise I'd be taking the week off, I'll be going to the doctors and I'd keep them posted.
Monday, I told my GP what had happened and they referred me to counselling, which I am now doing and it's working great. I asked if I could have a note to take to work where she advised that I can self certify for 7 days. So I did.
When I returned to work, I was then told I was having another hearing (which was today) in which my capability would be discussed. After it was discussed, it wad agreed that I am to be dismissed.
I discussed the meeting with my Dad. He asked me how it was conducted and I said that, there was myself, the manager doing the meeting and a note taker. The note taker typed up what was said, to which my Dad replied that everything should be hand written as things can be changed when typed up. He asked if I signed anything before I left to which I said no. He said that before leaving, I should have been given an opportunity to read through to notes and sign every page. He said even with the way it was conducted, I have every right to appeal.

I dunno, any advise from anyone?
I just want a simple life and a job.

Thank you for reading if you made it this far!

Replies

  • This should really be in the Employment forum.

    Anway, how long have you worked there?

    I think your Dad is completely wrong about the note taking. It is completely normal for them to be typed up afterwards and you would receive a copy.
  • JReacher1JReacher1 Forumite
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    It sounds like you joined in July 2016 so less than two years service. If that is true then you don't really have any rights to appeal.

    I wouldn't get side tracked about the note taking as that is basically irrelevant.
  • edited 24 April 2017 at 11:22PM
    [Deleted User][Deleted User] Forumite
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    edited 24 April 2017 at 11:22PM
    I think your Dad is completely wrong about the note taking. It is completely normal for them to be typed up afterwards and you would receive a copy.
    No, handwritten notes should ideally be countersigned on every page. They can then certainly be typed up, but the originals should be kept available to both parties.

    However, all this seems to be moot as the OP admits that his attendance has been erratic and that he has less than two years service.
    He can appeal to the company, but has no right of recourse to a tribunal.

    He should attend the prescribed counselling sessions and hopefully there will be no future self-inflicted injuries preventing him from attending his next job.
    Edited to add;
    Similar answers on the duplicate thread here;
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5638825
  • Has your GP diagnosed you with a (mental) disability?

    In the case that your GP has done so, then you qualify for protection under the Equality Act 2010.

    An employer must make reasonable adjustments for an employee if they are classified as disabled.
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
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    theronstar wrote: »

    An employer must make reasonable adjustments for an employee if they are classified as disabled.

    Define "reasonable".
    If you are querying your Council Tax band would you please state whether you are in England, Scotland or Wales
  • I agree it sounds to me like you need some kind of mental health assessment.

    Look up things like ASD, ADHD and see if any of them ring a bell. There are a lot of things that could be making anger difficult to deal with (past history for example) without a mental disability existing, but its worth looking at. But GP's have to have an idea where to send you for an assessment.

    And it has to be said, waiting lists are long I'm afraid, but for your long term health its a good idea.

    I remember I had problems with anger too and at one stage a GP suggested I might have a personality disorder. I never saw them again lol. 20 years later I've been diagnosed as having ASD. But lots of professionals dealing with my sons (who were diagnosed) had already said I didn't have it. Apparently they were wrong.
  • edited 1 May 2017 at 2:59PM
    agarnettagarnett
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    edited 1 May 2017 at 2:59PM
    I think your Dad is completely wrong about the note taking. It is completely normal for them to be typed up afterwards and you would receive a copy.
    No, handwritten notes should ideally be countersigned on every page. They can then certainly be typed up, but the originals should be kept available to both parties.
    I disagree with Cheeky_Monkey. I broadly agree with Moneyineptitude. There is nothing 'normal' about a record which was not made contemporaneously being touted as the actual full and true record, particularly with regard to any sort of authoritative investigation in any life scenario.

    Why do you think policemen still have notebooks, we have stenographers in courts and tape recorders in police stations?

    Cheeky_Monkey may be thinking of simple minute-taking at ordinary business meetings. As those of us in business know, those are frequently massaged to suit an audience, and even if contentious, drafts of those usually get passed or not passed as a true record at a latter meeting on a majority vote of those present. Hardly suitable practice for a disciplinary hearing, eh?

    If handwritten notes taken in a disciplinary meeting are not presentable then the person taking them has no business being in the meeting. It is only the record made at the time which forms the agreed record, and even in large companies it is usually handwritten sheets, and copies should be taken there and then and offered to the investigated party who (perhaps contrary to Moneyineptitude's suggestion) does not actually have to sign them on each page as a true record. There is no reason they should not be signed for (receipted), but the records themselvesshould perhaps not be receipted until the defending party has had a good chance to sit and analyse how the meeting has been recorded in those notes.

    The alternative is perhaps an agreed voice or video recording device, but without special equipment, a copy tape before the meeting breaks up is more problematical to provide than stuffing twenty pages of handwritten notes into a photocopier. Sure, both handwritten notes and tape recordings can be transcribed later for clarity, but neither can be discarded without agreement and superceded by anything else, typed or not.

    However, the chances of making anything of the technicality of not providing access to original meeting notes are now, I imagine, zero. They wanted the OP out and the OP is out, and in the UK employees now have to suck it up. God knows how bad it will become when we leave EU. Ruthless employers will rule the day, and the Labour movement will rue the Brexit referendum.
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