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Changing door locks yourself

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We're hopefully moving into our own house soon and I want to change the locks when we do. I never really thought about this aspect before, but after reading a of posts on here where people advise tenants etc to change their locks after moving in to properties it made me think about it, as our sellers used to have a lot of lodgers so who knows how many keys have been given out! A lot of posters have also mentioned about changing door locks yourself without the need for a locksmith, and I'm just wanting to know how feasible this really is? Is it easy to do? How expensive is it to buy the locks needed? I've had a quick Google but the locks needed in the likes of B&Q were still dear. My husband, who is usually quite handy around the house thinks it'll be too hard for him to do lol

Thanks!
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Comments

  • da_rule
    da_rule Posts: 3,618 Forumite
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    Without knowing exactly what sort of doors you have it will be impossible to really advise on how to replace the locks or the costs or even if it is possible.

    You'd be better off getting a professional if your husband isn't keen on doing it. You could end up completely wrecking the door and needing a replacement which would be a lot more inconvenient and costly.
  • csgohan4
    csgohan4 Posts: 10,599 Forumite
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    youtube is a first place to start
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land/Estate Agents"

    G_M/ Bowlhead99 RIP
  • DaftyDuck
    DaftyDuck Posts: 4,609 Forumite
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    I don't agree with above from da rule; I cant think of how you could wreck the door.

    If B&Q looks expensive, browse on Tool station (free delivery over ten squid). Screwfix as well, and there may be a branch near you. Swapping a like for like lock takes moments, and YouTube is packed with how to do it videos.

    Wait until you are there, look at the locks and, if it isn't obvious, post back for advice. There's a specific DIY forum on here if it gets complex.

    You, or hubby, CAN do it. I assure you.
  • PrettyFlower90
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    DaftyDuck wrote: »
    I don't agree with above from da rule; I cant think of how you could wreck the door.

    If B&Q looks expensive, browse on Tool station (free delivery over ten squid). Screwfix as well, and there may be a branch near you. Swapping a like for like lock takes moments, and YouTube is packed with how to do it videos.

    Wait until you are there, look at the locks and, if it isn't obvious, post back for advice. There's a specific DIY forum on here if it gets complex.

    You, or hubby, CAN do it. I assure you.

    Thanks! That was another thing, I wasn't too sure if I had posted on the right forum, didn't know there was a DIY one, so I will come back to that!

    The main doors are multi point locks on UPVC white doors.
  • anselld
    anselld Posts: 8,336 Forumite
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    The main doors are multi point locks on UPVC white doors.

    Very easy to change.

    Also very easy to break into if you buy a cheap cylinder.

    Get a 3-star kite mark cylinder if you want decent security.

    The old cylinder can be removed using one screw on the end of the door frame whilst open. (you need to turn the key slightly to remove it). Measure the lengths from each face to the centre screw hole to get the correct size replacement. The idea is that the lock does not stick out more than a few mm through the handle or escutcheon plate.
  • Mr.Generous
    Mr.Generous Posts: 3,515 Forumite
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    On PVCu doors its pretty easy once you know the size of the cylinder. Look up how to change a Euro profile cylinder on you tube and follow the instructions. Dont try and order new cylinders until you have measured, too many variations. Don't forget to get brass or chrome finish to match handles.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dqdv1awLnLI
    Mr Generous - Landlord for more than 10 years. Generous? - Possibly but sarcastic more likely.
  • Owain_Moneysaver
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    The main doors are multi point locks on UPVC white doors.

    Almost certainly Euro cylinders. In 99% of cases very easy to change.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
  • G_M
    G_M Posts: 51,977 Forumite
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    edited 28 January 2017 at 11:45PM
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    Utube guides. Get hubby to take a look. If he reckons he can't manage it after watching utube, change hubby instead of the locks.

    2 ways to get new locks:

    1) Take out old lock. Send hubby to locksmith, B&Q, Screwfix etc with the lock while you stay home protecting the fortress. Hubby gets a like-for-like lock (making sure it has BSI kitemark). Bring home and install.

    2) remove lock. Measure it as required (depending on lock-type - see guides). Replace original lock. Buy replacement on internet. Wait for delivery, then swop them over.

    Keep the old lock for your next property or to give relative when they move!

    Yale type latch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LA580cRHXDY

    mortice type lock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIPyqtOmprE

    Euro type lock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9A915L_mlk


    For replacement locks:

    https://www.locksonline.co.uk/

    http://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/products/locks_latches_and_security
  • zagubov
    zagubov Posts: 17,900 Forumite
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    I know this isn't really difficult to do as I'm really cack-handed, but even I've done this without problems (and deffo before youtube existed). You just need screwdrivers and a bit of time.

    These things come with instructions, but as csgohan4 says, youtube will have great examples.

    This is one of the least demanding bits of DIY you could be called on to do.
    There is no honour to be had in not knowing a thing that can be known - Danny Baker
  • [Deleted User]
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    I have bought cyclinder barrels on ebay, you can get better ones on there. No need to pay £100 plus.., even if you buy from B&Q etc you don't need to pay for a locksmith.
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