candles in rented property

Hi. Am interested if landlords add a clause to their tenany agreements saying candles cannot be used & if this would be enforceable? Thanks
Life's too short for wasting on ifs and might have beens...........
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  • glasgowdanglasgowdan Forumite
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    Is the landlord going to be watching you every evening? Just do what you like as long as the place doesn't get damaged! Re-read your own signature.
  • I can understand why a landlord would say that - so would I in their position. I've read too many accounts of people falling asleep or something without taking care to put candles out first. There is also the fact that smoke from candles discolours the decor.

    Why not buy those battery-powered "candles"? I've got some myself. I trust myself not to do anything like falling asleep with a candle burning - but I knew they would discolour my new decor and that standard cheaper candles in the room equate to a bit of "passive smoking" for me in effect and wouldnt be good for my health.

    Hence buying the battery "candles" - and they're fine.
  • FosterdogFosterdog Forumite
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    My tenancy agreement has a bit about candles, we are limited to using them on certain surfaces and not allowed to leave them unattended, common sense really that we wouldn't burn them on a windowsill where either the PVC could melt or the curtains could catch fire but I suppose some people just wouldn't think so it is included in the tenancy.
  • csgohan4csgohan4 Forumite
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    it's to protect themselves when they claim on insurance as well
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land/Estate Agents"

    G_M/ Bowlhead99 RIP
  • edited 28 September 2016 at 9:45AM
    Pixie5740Pixie5740 Forumite
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    edited 28 September 2016 at 9:45AM
    Interested as a landlord or a tenant?

    The landlord would need to catch the tenant burning candles before trying to enforce the clause. Sure a landlord could issue a Section 8 notice on the basis of breach of contract but I think that ground is discretionary. Then it would be down to a judge to decide. On the other hand a landlord can issue a Section 21 for no reason at all so then it wouldn't matter if the candle clause was enforceable or not.

    Do some insurance policies forbid the use of candles in the property? If so and the candle usage caused significant damage to the property but the landlord couldn't claim on their insurance to cover the damage then I suppose the landlord could pursue the tenant to cover the costs of said damage.

    This all said, candles are only dangerous if you do something daft like leaving them unattended, lighting them near moving fabric such as curtains etc.
  • KynthiaKynthia Forumite
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    Obviously the landlord isn't going to know if you discreetly use candles and a judge isn't going to allow a landlord to evict someone mid - tenancy for using them if no damage has occurred. However if damage does occur if give the landlord a stronger case for claiming damages from tge tenant, their insurance may require them to put it in the agreement, and it may reduce candle usage in the property which reduces the risk (as some people might comply or use them less).

    I stupidly had an accident with a small candle when renting as a student, damaged the carpet and was put off using them. No defense as I was young and inexperienced in safely using them. So a clause like that might have stopped me and prevented that. Not that I believe everything tgat has tge potential to cause damage shoukd be prevented in tge tenancy agreement as it's tge tenants home to enjoy while they live there.
    Don't listen to me, I'm no expert!
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    As Pixie says, it's a moot point about enforcement, and the clause is likely there as rear-end covering, so use your own judgement.
  • Rosemary7391Rosemary7391 Forumite
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    I can understand why a landlord would say that - so would I in their position. I've read too many accounts of people falling asleep or something without taking care to put candles out first. There is also the fact that smoke from candles discolours the decor.

    Why not buy those battery-powered "candles"? I've got some myself. I trust myself not to do anything like falling asleep with a candle burning - but I knew they would discolour my new decor and that standard cheaper candles in the room equate to a bit of "passive smoking" for me in effect and wouldnt be good for my health.

    Hence buying the battery "candles" - and they're fine.

    I've never noticed candles affecting decoration... How long would it take? My candles aren't typically smokey, I wouldn't like that, but I use scented tealights quite frequently and never had any problems.
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    I've never noticed candles affecting decoration... How long would it take? My candles aren't typically smokey, I wouldn't like that, but I use scented tealights quite frequently and never had any problems.

    And I have a wood burner, so I'd never know.

    The dark months are dismal enough without having a guilt-trip over candles.

    Burn today, re-paint at leisure, I say!
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    I've never noticed candles affecting decoration... How long would it take? My candles aren't typically smokey, I wouldn't like that, but I use scented tealights quite frequently and never had any problems.

    And I have a wood burner, so I'd never know.

    The dark months are dismal enough without having a guilt-trip over candles and real fires.

    Burn today, re-paint at leisure!
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