Cascading first floor window box

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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hollydayshollydays Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Is it possible to plant some kind of vine in a first floor window box which us about four feet long and sturdily constructed so it cascades down a long way? If so , which and when would you plant it?

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  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    Don't know the answer but one problem for anything hanging down would be the root depth to anchor it. A window box doesn't give much root depth
  • How about something that sticks to the wall and supports itself, like ivy or Virginia creeper? Or there are lots of fast-growing annuals (if you don't mind it bare in winter) that might do like Morning Glory or Cobaea Scandens.

    For a perennial that's not too heavy the only thing that springs to my mind is one of the daintier clematises (or should that be clematii? I have no idea of the plural of clematis, :) )
  • hollydayshollydays Forumite
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    unforeseen wrote: »
    Don't know the answer but one problem for anything hanging down would be the root depth to anchor it. A window box doesn't give much root depth

    This is what I was wondering, but as its rampant I am now thinking I've got nothing to lose by giving it a try.
    I wanted something that has autumn winter interest and won't take much watering as it's an upper window.
  • edited 17 January 2016 at 10:00AM
    hollydayshollydays Forumite
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    edited 17 January 2016 at 10:00AM
    Elsewhere wrote: »
    How about something that sticks to the wall and supports itself, like ivy or Virginia creeper? Or there are lots of fast-growing annuals (if you don't mind it bare in winter) that might do like Morning Glory or Cobaea Scandens.

    For a perennial that's not too heavy the only thing that springs to my mind is one of the daintier clematises (or should that be clematii? I have no idea of the plural of clematis, :) )

    I don't want anything clinging to the wall , but I'm now thinking of maybe planting Virginia creeper in the hope it will cascade.
    I've seen a photo of morning glory cascading if the Virginia creeper doesn't work I'll give that a try if it's fairly drought resistant.i do love clematis Montana I wonder if I could have a long section of that for Spring interest too? I may have to pull it all out after one year if it gets too congested- I think white shades will be better than pink for my house.hmm I'm thinking a less vigorous Montana might be better than a Virginia creeper

    Thanks for the replies :)
  • grace68grace68 Forumite
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    i had balcony boxes last year and started growing training rosemary, its only got to 1 1/2 ft in first year of growth, from plug plant, but might be worth a go.

    grace
  • edited 17 January 2016 at 6:00PM
    stumpycatstumpycat Forumite
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    edited 17 January 2016 at 6:00PM
    I had a honeysuckle growing in a window box in my flat in Edinburgh. It was lovely and seemed quite happy - it was in one of the more substantial window boxes.

    I took it with me when we moved & planted it outside my front door - and it's HUGE! :)

    eta. I tied heavy duty wire around the window box & screwed it to the sill, so it was secure.
  • hollydayshollydays Forumite
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    Thanks , I'll think about honeysuckle too. It's an upstairs bedroom window in my house and frequently watering it isn't something I want to do .
    Thanks for all the suggestions
  • Will get over a metre from some Indian mint.
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