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Typical cost of resin-bonded stone driveway?

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Typical cost of resin-bonded stone driveway?

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itm2itm2 Forumite
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The front of our townhouse currently has a badly worn and damaged paved surface, and we're thinking of replacing it with a resin-bonded stone surface. It's about 25 square metres, and we're in south west London.

Does anyone know what sort of all-in cost we'd be looking at to have this work done?
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Replies

  • FurtsFurts Forumite
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    Remember the rule of thumb before going down this route. A resin drive will not repair a damaged drive - it will only coat over the damage. In many instances the damage will come through again - but it is not possible to say when this will be.
  • TonyMMMTonyMMM Forumite
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    Furts wrote: »
    Remember the rule of thumb before going down this route. A resin drive will not repair a damaged drive - it will only coat over the damage. In many instances the damage will come through again - but it is not possible to say when this will be.

    I would agree with this - we have a resin bound driveway which we are very happy with and looks very good, but the installer spent a long time removing all the old tarmac surface and levelling & making good before the resin surface was laid.

    I would get some quotes and ask to see examples of their work and speak to previous customers.
  • itm2itm2 Forumite
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    Presumably they would remove all of the existing paving stones (which is the part which is damaged) and, assuming the layer underneath is sound, simply lay the new surface on top?

    Has anyone had any recent quotes for a similar job?
  • Resin bonded crap I’d say 99 % are put down wrong the other 1% you’ll be lucky to get any descent life out of it when compared with traditional methods :rotfl:
  • itm2itm2 Forumite
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    Resin bonded crap I’d say 99 % are put down wrong the other 1% you’ll be lucky to get any descent life out of it when compared with traditional methods :rotfl:

    Hmmm....I've seen a few "don't touch it with a bargepole" comments on t'internet, but alot of people don't seem to differentiate between resin-bound and resin-bonded. And of course a lot of people have been stitched up by cowboy builders who would probably have screwed up the job no matter what materials they had used. As is often the case, it's hard to know who/what to believe :0(
  • tired_dadtired_dad Forumite
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    drive around in nice areas and keep an eye out on other peoples driveways. Get way of discovering what your spanky new driveway will look like once its worn in.

    I was up for a RBD but was put off by some old driveways that looked tatty.

    Problem with this is technology changes and maybe a new system will last longer. However, its too much money for me to take a punt
  • itm2itm2 Forumite
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    tired_dad wrote: »
    drive around in nice areas and keep an eye out on other peoples driveways. Get way of discovering what your spanky new driveway will look like once its worn in.

    Funnily enough that's how I got the idea. I keep seeing these things locally in Richmond-Upon-Thames and they look very nice.
  • We had a long drive redone last summer with resin-bound surface and it looked wonderful. A 'thin' layer of tarmac was wearing through in a few places and the workmen remove anything that was loose and bonded small gravel stones to create a firm surface. He 'trowelled' it all by hand on his knees and it took a couple of days. He said he would simply apply more thickly where the surface was uneven to create a level drive. It was about 130 sq. metres and cost nearly £5000
    However... by November we noticed a 'waviness' had started to occur along the drive. Also the join between one days work and the next became more obvious. We used Andy Nunn's company from Suffolk and he has been in business for over 20 years, so we assumed expert results. despite numerous e-mails we have not had a response yet (since early December) so we are concerned things will get worse and the waves even more pronounced.
    So,,, my message would be to make sure the under-surface is absolutely level and firm.
  • itm2itm2 Forumite
    865 posts
    Part of the Furniture 500 Posts Hung up my suit!
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    We had a long drive redone last summer with resin-bound surface and it looked wonderful. A 'thin' layer of tarmac was wearing through in a few places and the workmen remove anything that was loose and bonded small gravel stones to create a firm surface. He 'trowelled' it all by hand on his knees and it took a couple of days. He said he would simply apply more thickly where the surface was uneven to create a level drive. It was about 130 sq. metres and cost nearly £5000
    However... by November we noticed a 'waviness' had started to occur along the drive. Also the join between one days work and the next became more obvious. We used Andy Nunn's company from Suffolk and he has been in business for over 20 years, so we assumed expert results. despite numerous e-mails we have not had a response yet (since early December) so we are concerned things will get worse and the waves even more pronounced.
    So,,, my message would be to make sure the under-surface is absolutely level and firm.

    Thanks for the warning. I notice that your driveway was resin bonded, rather than resin bound (in which the gravel is laid on top of the resin, as opposed to the resin bonded option which involves pre-mixing the resin and gravel and laying it as one). I'm told that resin bound surfaces are more robust, but am struggling to verify whether that's true, and if so exactly how robust.
  • EssexExileEssexExile Forumite
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    I've thought about this for a long time. When I lived in Essex resin bonded/bound drives were all the rage. I moved to the midlands about 15 years ago & they were unheard up here. Then a place round the corner had their drive done & I kept an eye on how it lasted. It looked great for a few years but now is starting to sink & looks quite tatty. I've also wondered how they would look if they need to be dug into for any reason & repaired.

    I've got a large area of drive & when I get fed up with weeding between the paviours it'll be tarmac for me.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
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