breakdown recovery

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Small Biz & Charities' MoneySaving
10 replies 649 views
v40volv40vol Forumite
35 Posts
Part of the Furniture 10 Posts
I would like buy recovery vehicle and start breakdown recovery business, buying the vehicle is not a problem. but haven't got a clue where to start with the rest. any ideas much appreciated. :confused:

Replies

  • motorguymotorguy Forumite
    21.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Have you any experience at all in that field?

    I would expect a lot of these recovery companies are tied in with insurance companies, are registered with the local police force, have drivers trained to deal with crashed vehicles, that sort of thing. So unless you've been a recovery driver before....
  • v40volv40vol Forumite
    35 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10 Posts
    pgilc1 wrote: »
    Have you any experience at all in that field?

    I would expect a lot of these recovery companies are tied in with insurance companies, are registered with the local police force, have drivers trained to deal with crashed vehicles, that sort of thing. So unless you've been a recovery driver before....

    Was a motor mechanic many years ago, now a maintenance engineer in a factory. But would be willing to go on a trianing course for the recovery side of things. just don't know where to start.
  • scbkscbk Forumite
    1.2K Posts
    1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭
    Tbh you'll struggle to get much business working for yourself on your own. Why would someone phone you up if there's other local companies with many vehicles and drivers, who would be on call 24/7

    If you want to get into recovery then think about being employed, either for a local company or AA/RAC

    If you want to work for yourself then what about being a mobile mechanic?
  • custardycustardy Forumite
    38K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    you also have the car/bike transport side of things to look at.
    just look on ebay at the people offering transport. problem is to make it work you need ot keep the truck working for you
    also good liability insurance is required for sure.
    i think a lot of breakdown companies use local firms anyway,even if you get on the books as a tow truck rather than breakdown service if you know what i mean
  • motorguymotorguy Forumite
    21.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I agree with the above, i cant see it being a goer if you have no significant experience in the field to build on
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
    43.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Some of the breakdown services do use independent firms rather than their own fleet of drivers and vehicles, eg Britannia Rescue. But bear in mind you may need to be on call 24/7 at times - I'm sure you could give non-availability but if it was too great they wouldn't use you - and drop everything to get to the breakdown.

    I agree that mobile mechanic might have more going for it!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
  • v40volv40vol Forumite
    35 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10 Posts
    Thanks everybody for the advice, think I'll give recovery a miss. :eek: mobile mechanic sounds a good idea. :T still got all my tools, but what else would i need to do. where do i start. :confused:
  • scbkscbk Forumite
    1.2K Posts
    1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭
    v40vol wrote: »
    mobile mechanic sounds a good idea. :T still got all my tools, but what else would i need to do. where do i start. :confused:

    Just fire off your self employment form to the HMRC, get yourself a van and kit it out with all your tools. Advertise on gumtree/local notice boards/corner shop window/local paper/yell.com etc (all these ways are cheap/free)

    You'd probably also want some public liability insurance

    Then just work on it from there ;)
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
    43.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Tell ALL your friends and neighbours what your hourly rates are (and don't set them too low!), maybe offer to take cars for MOTs and do any necessary work afterwards (as long as you're competent!) You will need to ensure you have appropriate insurance before driving a client's car, of course ...

    And make sure that if there are problems you can't fix, you know a man who can! Before we changed our car, we used a little local garage, there was a separate tyre-fitter working out of the same premises, but for complicated electrics (we had an elderly Saab, enough said!) they used to send us to a garage specialising in electrics.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
  • v40volv40vol Forumite
    35 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10 Posts
    Thanks every body for the advice, been very usefull. :beer:
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Ultrafast broadband upgrades

Being made available to more English counties

MSE News

30+ ways to stop scams

Incl tips to spot 'em & what to do if you're scammed

MSE Guides

£37 of No7 beauty products for £12

Available online and in stores

MSE Deals