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Purpose of key locking on windows?

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PossomPossom Forumite
433 posts
I was wondering what is the purpose of key locking on house windows?

Once the handle of a window is pushed into the correct position the window is closed and cannot (in theory) be opened from the outside.

But some/many window handles also have a key to lock them internally. Is this to stop someone from getting out, or what is the point of the inside key lock?
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Replies

  • HappyMJHappyMJ Forumite
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    Possom wrote: »
    I was wondering what is the purpose of key locking on house windows?

    Once the handle of a window is pushed into the correct position the window is closed and cannot (in theory) be opened from the outside.

    But some/many window handles also have a key to lock them internally. Is this to stop someone from getting out, or what is the point of the inside key lock?

    There isn't much point. A window handle lock of mine broke once and jammed in the locked position covering the screw. Easy to fix. Force it open and it will break. Then replace with a new handle.
    :footie:
    :p Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) :p Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money. :p
  • southcoastrgisouthcoastrgi Forumite
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    what happens if you have children or don't you mind them opening the windows & falling out ?
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
  • NilremNilrem Forumite
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    I think it's so that if someone breaks the window from outside they then can't (Easily) just undo the handle, open the window fully and brush away any glass to give themselves a larger, less sharp opening to climb in through.

    It also lets you lock the window slightly open in most cases.

    And as southcoastgi says it means you can prevent little ones from opening the window.
  • anotherbaldrickanotherbaldrick Forumite
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    You may well find your Insurance Company require you to lock with that key when the property is empty. Read your Policy Document.
    You scullion! You rampallian! You fustilarian! I’ll tickle your catastrophe (Henry IV part 2)
  • VoucherManVoucherMan Forumite
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    You may well find your Insurance Company require you to lock with that key when the property is empty. Read your Policy Document.

    I don't have the keys for my window locks, so whenever my renewal is due I answer the 'are you windows fitted with key operated locks?' no. I then refil the quote answering yes (they are fitted with locks, I just don't have the keys for them:o), and the price has never yet changed.

    So it won't help on safety, but for insurance purposes it's unlikey to make much difference. I've never investigated any 'empty property' clauses though.
  • edited 19 August 2015 at 7:23AM
    NilremNilrem Forumite
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    edited 19 August 2015 at 7:23AM
    VoucherMan wrote: »
    I don't have the keys for my window locks, so whenever my renewal is due I answer the 'are you windows fitted with key operated locks?' no. I then refil the quote answering yes (they are fitted with locks, I just don't have the keys for them:o), and the price has never yet changed.

    So it won't help on safety, but for insurance purposes it's unlikey to make much difference. I've never investigated any 'empty property' clauses though.

    I suspect a picky insurance company in the event of a claim may well point to the quite reasonable assumption that the locks were in full working order (IE they locked) when you ticked yes on the quote.
    Obviously for locks to work as intended they need the key.

    It's the sort of thing that may or may not make a difference to the quote cost, but if it's entered as being there on the quote they expect it to be correct as it forms one of the conditions of that particular quote/contract.

    From memory our insurance mentions that when the house is unoccupied they expect windows and doors to be secured (and locked if locks are fitted).

    You can usually pick up spare/replacement keys for window locks fairly cheaply, I think I picked up about a dozen for something like £20 a couple of years back as I was fed up of not having a key in every room/lock (somehow half the keys got lost), so I bought the spares and put tags on them so when someone takes them out and puts them on the side I can find them again.
  • bolistonboliston Forumite
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    Same as deadlocking a door - if someone breaks into my property via a window they cannot simply unlock the door from the inside and load the contents into a van.
  • GwylimTGwylimT Forumite
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    Lots if windows don't have handles that are effectively locked when turned, our windows are wooden and the handles are a bit like internal doors when shut, so a good shake and you can get them open.

    When we has UPVC and these our insurance has always required windows to be locked when we are out.
  • steevisteevi Forumite
    43 posts
    My new build is fitted with handles that don't have keys. Someone forced the smaller window open, reached in and opened the big window to come through.

    If we'd had key-locking windows, that wouldn't have happened.
  • HappyMJHappyMJ Forumite
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    boliston wrote: »
    Same as deadlocking a door - if someone breaks into my property via a window they cannot simply unlock the door from the inside and load the contents into a van.
    As my home is a first floor flat fire regulations require the door to be opened from the inside without a key.

    A determined burglar could (using a ladder) break a window enter the property and could easily escape via the front door. It's a busy road it's unlikely neighbours would hear the noise of the window breaking.
    steevi wrote: »
    My new build is fitted with handles that don't have keys. Someone forced the smaller window open, reached in and opened the big window to come through.

    If we'd had key-locking windows, that wouldn't have happened.

    Be careful relying on handle locks they are very easily broken by an intruder. It still would have happened it just would have taken the intruder 2 seconds to break the lock.
    :footie:
    :p Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) :p Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money. :p
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