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Redundancy, signing on and pension guarantee credit

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2

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  • poppasmurf_bewdley
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    If you are entitled to Guaranteed Pension Credit, then you can opt to take this instead of signing on for JSA.

    That's what I did when I reached 60. My private pension was nowhere near the PC limit, so was topped up to that limit. In addition, full council tax benefit and housing benefit/allowance can be claimed.
    "There are not enough superlatives in the English language to describe a 'Princess Coronation' locomotive in full cry. We shall never see their like again". O S Nock
  • choppersangel
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    Thank you poppasmurf_bewdley (the lovely South Worc's town? Ah, used to know it well :) ) That is pretty much what we thought, it's the 'opt to' bit that makes the difference; we already have HB and full council tax relief so mostly things won't change, although the PC amount will be less over all.
  • benniebert
    benniebert Posts: 666 Forumite
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    If you are entitled to Guaranteed Pension Credit, then you can opt to take this instead of signing on for JSA.

    That's what I did when I reached 60. My private pension was nowhere near the PC limit, so was topped up to that limit. In addition, full council tax benefit and housing benefit/allowance can be claimed.

    But doesn't that defeat the whole idea? You are still able (so the DWP say) to work (unless being awarded ESA work group/support group) right up until the day you receive the State Pension. If being out of work is a problem that is where JSA comes into play. By 'opting' out of JSA you are not getting all of the help that is there to get back to work. To me it seems to be a 'coasting' situation for up to 5 years when the SRP kicks in.


    I claimed contribution based ESA, went through regular assessments etc right up to the day of my 65th. I also claimed a top up from PC for those 5 years. I could have had the whole lot through PC and closed down the ESA claim, but thought that that wasn't the right thing to do.
  • poppasmurf_bewdley
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    benniebert wrote: »
    But doesn't that defeat the whole idea? You are still able (so the DWP say) to work (unless being awarded ESA work group/support group) right up until the day you receive the State Pension. If being out of work is a problem that is where JSA comes into play. By 'opting' out of JSA you are not getting all of the help that is there to get back to work. To me it seems to be a 'coasting' situation for up to 5 years when the SRP kicks in.


    I claimed contribution based ESA, went through regular assessments etc right up to the day of my 65th. I also claimed a top up from PC for those 5 years. I could have had the whole lot through PC and closed down the ESA claim, but thought that that wasn't the right thing to do.

    Have you ever tried getting a decent job when you are between 60 and 65? It is damn near impossible. In fact, anybody over 50 will struggle these days, as I can vouch for.
    "There are not enough superlatives in the English language to describe a 'Princess Coronation' locomotive in full cry. We shall never see their like again". O S Nock
  • benniebert
    benniebert Posts: 666 Forumite
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    Have you ever tried getting a decent job when you are between 60 and 65? It is damn near impossible. In fact, anybody over 50 will struggle these days, as I can vouch for.

    But is that a good enough reason not to claim JSA and get help in trying to find one? Claiming PC sets no such requirements so it is very unlikely that he will find a job.
    PC is a 'cop out' when either ESA or JSA could be claimed. It's the easy option and to be honest, morally wrong.
  • sleepless_saver
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    benniebert wrote: »
    But doesn't that defeat the whole idea? You are still able (so the DWP say) to work (unless being awarded ESA work group/support group) right up until the day you receive the State Pension. If being out of work is a problem that is where JSA comes into play. By 'opting' out of JSA you are not getting all of the help that is there to get back to work. To me it seems to be a 'coasting' situation for up to 5 years when the SRP kicks in.

    I claimed contribution based ESA, went through regular assessments etc right up to the day of my 65th. I also claimed a top up from PC for those 5 years. I could have had the whole lot through PC and closed down the ESA claim, but thought that that wasn't the right thing to do.

    Sounds like troll andy is back again. Suggesting the OP's husband would somehow be doing something morally wrong by not signing on for JSA when he has absolutely no need to is just disgraceful.

    OP, of course your husband can look for work if he wants to while he is claiming pension credit. The advantage of not having to sign on for JSA is that he won't have the stress of jumping through their hoops and can take his time to find something that suits him and fits with his caring for you as well.
  • benniebert
    benniebert Posts: 666 Forumite
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    Sounds like troll andy is back again. Suggesting the OP's husband would somehow be doing something morally wrong by not signing on for JSA when he has absolutely no need to is just disgraceful.

    OP, of course your husband can look for work if he wants to while he is claiming pension credit. The advantage of not having to sign on for JSA is that he won't have the stress of jumping through their hoops and can take his time to find something that suits him and fits with his caring for you as well.



    All I can say that when UC is rolled out this particular carry on will be closed down. As for being a troll, no way mate, not me! But what I said about my claim is what I did. I continued with the Contribution ESA (had 2 reassessments etc in the 5 years up to my 65th) I also topped up our income with PC.
    So given your comment I am also disgraceful for claiming ESA, jumping through the hoops, having the stress of being re-assessed when I could so easily have closed ESA down and received the same total income via PC? But was what I did morally right or wrong? I believe it was the right thing to do.
  • choppersangel
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    Thank you to Sleepless Saver for putting a simple point with kindness.
    Bennibert:
    My whole reason for asking about this is not to do with whether my husband actually works, looks for work, wants to work or not; it is whether as pointed out he is required to register as available for work with the jobcentre which actually makes him physically anxious to think about. He will most likely work, but not for 16+ hours, as said I am disabled and he is my carer, it is not possible for him to offer more than this. We live simply and ethically, choosing not to sign on - which looks ever more the attractive option - is just a practical way to avoid anguish.
  • dodger1
    dodger1 Posts: 4,579 Forumite
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    Have you ever tried getting a decent job when you are between 60 and 65? It is damn near impossible. In fact, anybody over 50 will struggle these days, as I can vouch for.

    Precisely. When I was made redundant at 60 I actually went to sign on and was informed at the jobcentre that at my age it was pretty much pointless and the adviser suggested the pension credit route. I did however still look for work off my own bat.
    It's someone else's fault.
  • Mojisola
    Mojisola Posts: 35,559 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
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    My husband is 63 years old and about to be made redundant from his part-time job. He has been working 16+ hours per week for 4.5 years, receiving Working Tax Credit on top of his wages and for just over one year has also been getting Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.

    As of 29th of this month he will be unemployed. He is my part-time carer (I am disabled with MS and have mobility problems)

    What benefits are you on? Could he claim Carer's Allowance?
    https://www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/overview

    He could still earn about £100 a week even if he can get CA so he could keep looking for part-time work.
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