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'A threat to the government on students' £21,000 loan repayment' blog discussion

edited 9 January 2015 at 11:59AM in Martin's Blogs & Appearances & MoneySavingExpert in the News
45 replies 12.8K views
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Replies

  • edited 14 January 2015 at 10:46AM
    ericcthekingericctheking Forumite
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    edited 14 January 2015 at 10:46AM
    Dewpoint wrote: »
    No - I think the threshold should be frozen at the level agreed when the student started university. Applying "inflation" is nonsense. Most students will enjoy a steadily growing income after graduation, and it's right they pay back an increasing amount to the British taxpayer who helped them enjoy the added benefits of a university education. It will also make some students think twice about embarking on Mickey-Mouse "degree" courses that only qualifies them for serving French fries at McDonalds after three years!

    Another person who doesn't understand how student loans were sold! Yes it might make students think twice about taking on the debt if they were sold as regular loans. They were not sold as regular loans get it?! How can you make a rational decision if because some people have discredited old fashioned values about debt that the terms and conditions of the loans change after you sign.
    Also these loans will be sold to an American owned vulture like tax avoiding debt collecting agency for pennies in the pound after the election. So the money will not be going to the British taxpayer but to Delaware!
  • JimmyTheWigJimmyTheWig Forumite
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    Many people wouldn't have now, if that's your most recent example its poor
    Not my most recent example, no. Just what first popped into my head...
  • tgroom57tgroom57 Forumite
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    I would have phrased the headline differently, you are "Giving notice to the government... " that you will be "a thorn in their side, and they will never hear the last of it." Even a mass protest might quickly fade, you need to convey the impression that you will not let this matter rest.

    As an aside, if the loans were truly mis-sold to people that were unable to repay, then the government should take a warning from wonga, who had to write off £220m of loans.

    Whether the £21,000 threshold is frozen or linked to inflation is somewhat academic for the next few years if we are looking at low inflation fgures. I would be looking at reining in the threshold with something like -
    linked to inflation or 2% increase, whichever is lower.

    Lastly, my firm belief is that every complaint should be accompanied by an alternative and workable solution- not necessarily the perfect and lasting objective, but an improvement on what was originally offfered.

    If you have a better idea for improving the student loan repayment & lending fiasco Martin, let's hear it.

  • Why anybody would believe what any government promises on student loans is beyond me.
  • edited 14 January 2015 at 11:03AM
    DewpointDewpoint Forumite
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    edited 14 January 2015 at 11:03AM
    Another person who doesn't understand how student loans were sold! Yes it might make students think twice about taking on the debt if they were sold as regular loans. They were not sold as regular loans get it?! How can you make a rational decision if because some people have discredited old fashioned values about debt that the terms and conditions of the loans change after you sign.
    Also these loans will be sold to an American owned vulture like tax avoiding debt collecting agency for pennies in the pound after the election. So the money will not be going to the British taxpayer but to Delaware!

    A loan is a loan. The British taxpayer stumped up the money, and the student agreed to pay it back under the terms of the loan at the time. Nothing "old-fashioned" about expecting people to honour debt agreements, unless of course you are the sort of boorish person who is intolerant of other's opinions.
    Martin should stick to blagging discounts from Boots rather than getting involved in political posturing. He's treading on dangerous ground.
  • JimmyTheWigJimmyTheWig Forumite
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    tgroom57 wrote: »
    I would have phrased the headline differently, you are "Giving notice to the government... " that you will be "a thorn in their side, and they will never hear the last of it." Even a mass protest might quickly fade, you need to convey the impression that you will not let this matter rest.
    I think the blog gave the impression that Martin won't let the matter rest.
    But rather than it just being Martin as a thorn in the government's side, he is saying that there will be many people up in arms about it.
  • In principle agree with Martin making noise on this issue. To support today's students, as I didn't get any loan facility when studying diploma then hons degree as mature student in 1990s.


    Just want to point out that govt has changed other schemes with no support to those who bought into on terms promised and then changed. I am one of thousands who have lost public sector pension - paid contributions for 20 yrs on promise of final salary pension at age 60, included added-years scheme to make up for periods of unemployment and study; it was then scrapped (technically frozen) and replaced by inferior and complicated scheme which may offer some pension at age 68 if i'm lucky.


    What other services have been mis-sold.
  • So grateful to Martin for letting us know the truth about what exactly is going on. I have forwarded Martin's blog to my son, a student at Bournemouth Uni. We will demonstrate, if necessary. Thank you, Martin. Not only for this but for helping me to get back on track financially.
  • Very much agree with you on this one Martin, will back you all the way.
  • agarnettagarnett
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    Dewpoint wrote: »
    A loan is a loan ...bla bla ...
    A mis-sold loan is a mis-sold loan and a mis-sold loan is unenforceable as a consequence of the rule of law, as opposed to arbitrary decisions by individual government officials.

    BTW, you might expect us to see your username as something cool, but doesn't dew point turn on temperature with pressure, and on relative humidity, I think? Can you not feel the temperature rising ? Is it just hot air or something more permanent ? The pressure is also building. It follows that dew point will not be so cool. Are the government overly perspiring in relative terms ?
    He's treading on dangerous ground.
    Can you elaborate, please ? Dangerous for whom ? Persons downwind of government flunkies' armpits ?
This discussion has been closed.
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