Christmas story book for a badly behaved 5 year old

I'm having big problems with my nearly 5 year old and whilst I know that christmas is a temporary stop gap in getting them to behave (he has an older sister), I'd love to get a christmas book that I could read to him that demonstrates the magic of christmas and santa visiting only 'well behaved' children. Something along the lines of the night before christmas would be lovely.

This afternoon I was threatened to cancel christmas and was seriously close to actually doing just that. I know he's tired as it's been a long first term at school but when he tries to rip up the christmas present he has made for his teacher after an already fraught morning routine and pick up, I can't think of anything else. I'm frazzled too!

I would love for us to have a fun holiday season but at this rate it's not going to be. Any suggestions on a book that I could get in store?
"I've fallen down a hole" - said in best Monty Python voice-over.
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Comments

  • lovinituk
    lovinituk Posts: 5,711 Forumite
    Combo Breaker First Post
    You can do a naughty child version of Santas video message here - https://www.portablenorthpole.com/

    Not sure how cruel it would actually be though! Could ruin Christmas for them forever!
  • Alleycat
    Alleycat Posts: 4,599 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    Oooh! Tempted but I think he's so flaky that a video wouldn't really hit home as much as a printed book sat on his side table that shares christmas cheer but explains in his language that he has to be good. Less direct!
    "I've fallen down a hole" - said in best Monty Python voice-over.
  • kingfisherblue
    kingfisherblue Posts: 9,203 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post Xmas Saver!
    edited 19 December 2014 at 8:54AM
    The Empty Stocking is about identical twin girls. One is good and the other is naughty. One year, Santa fills Sam's stocking, but not Charlie's, as Charlie has been so bad. He gets the stockings mixed up, though, and leaves the full stocking on Charlie's bed. She wakes up a couple of hours later and is delighted to see her full stocking, but dismayed to see her sister's empty stcking. She doesn't really stop to think that Santa has mixed them up, but she does divide the gifts between the two stockings, so that her sister gets things as well. On his way home, Santa's Good/Bad machine bleeps and he has to turn back. Charlie's kindness in sharing results in Santa filling both stockings to the brim. He also adds a little red badge saying 'Good Girl' to Charlie's stocking.


    I bought the book from a garden centre, to adapt for Brownies and Rainbows next year. As it stands, it isn't ideal, IMO. It gives examples of Charlie's naughtiness (and what child needs extra ideas!), and the implication is that if you are naughty, but do a good deed in sharing your presents, then all is forgiven. There isn't a longer lasting solution in the book, although it does imply that the badge encourages Charlie to be better behaved in the future.


    On Amazon, I can only find a Kindle edition:


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Empty-Stocking-Richard-Curtis-ebook/dp/B00CMYM8D4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1418975579&sr=1-1&keywords=the+empty+stocking


    An alternative idea is to say something along the lines of 'You have twelve presents to unwrap, but each time you are naughty, you will have one present taken away'. That way, he still gets some presents, but fewer than his sister.


    As you say, it is only a stop gap. If your child is behaving really badly, you need to look further into why this is happening. Is he just boisterous compared to his sister, or is he truly naughty? Does he get enough sleep? Is there a trigger? Maybe, for example, if he is naughty when he gets home from school, you could change his routine (sit down with a drink and a biscuit or piece of fruit for half an hour, while you read a story and talk about the children's day, instead of allowing him to go and play or making sure that homework is done straight away - gives him time to rest in a calm atmosphere, as he is likely to be tired after a day at school).


    Also consider if he is naughty at school. Does he struggle with his work? Can he concentrate? One of my children has special needs (I'm not suggesting that your son does). He found concentrating difficult. I found that playing simple board games with him helped (Orchard have a good range). This encouraged concentration, turn taking, and patience, as well as helping in areas such as counting.


    School might also be able to help, especially if he is disruptive.


    One other thing, has he had a recent eye test? If not, then maybe consider it. I've known a number of children (through my voluntary work in schools and as a Rainbow and Brownie Guider for many years) to have difficulties. For several, having an eye test has revealed that glasses have been needed. Whilst they are not a miracle cure for poor behaviour, if a child can't see clearly, glasses can help reduce frustration and feelings of inadequacy.


    I hope that, whatever, you decide to do this Christmas, you have a great time as a family, and that you manage to help your son learn to control his behaviour as he grows.


    Take care x
  • I know this isn't specific to Christmas but I used to read my children
    Hilaire Belloc's cautionary tales for children it's very old but still makes me laugh.
  • Spendless
    Spendless Posts: 24,137 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
    Not exactly what you've asked for, but my daughter was gifted this when she was 4 and fell in love with the story, which is the little girl having to do x, y, z (eg buy presents for her parents, put nuts out for birds) before moving onto the next task. For years we've had to replicate as much of the book as we can, including last weekend when we had to 'ride home on the bus when dark and the (christmas) lights were shining and DD is now 11. Just a suggestion for you to say if you're good we'll do the next page and so on

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Was-That-Christmas-Hilary-McKay/dp/0689847653
  • Hedgehog99
    Hedgehog99 Posts: 1,425 Forumite
    Long-shot, but if you can find a good English translation of some of the Austrian/Bavarian Winter/Christmas stories, they are scarier/more gruesome than the English ones - Krampus should be able to encourage good behaviour.
  • elsien
    elsien Posts: 32,664 Forumite
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Anniversary First Post
    If you need a quick fix, I used to know a nursery school where if kids were being naughty the fairy used to vanish off the top of the Christmas tree to go and report to Santa......
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • cef66
    cef66 Posts: 133 Forumite
    I'd second 'The empty stocking' - a great story for lots of reasons. You could hear a pin drop when I read it to my year 1 class last week when it came to the bit when Santa left only 1 stocking full of presents. They were all mesmerised till the end. ( It does explain some of the naughtiness too.)

    I'd recommend this book for any child, one of my favourites.

    Try and find something (anything) that he can be good at before the big day and praise him for it.

    The 3 'naughtiest' children in my class found the last week of term very difficult and were even more challenging than usual. They found all the Christmas activities and extras and being off timetable, so no routine, difficult to cope with. It was all too exciting for them. They were better and happier doing handwriting practise than the Christmas worksheets which they just couldn't settle to and I kept up the 1:1 reading which helped.

    I'd keep up your normal home routine as much as you can and lessen all the countdown and 'big day' talk if possible, difficult I know.
  • 74jax
    74jax Posts: 7,921 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
    My friend cancelled Christmas for her eldest. She said if he didn't behave Santa wouldn't come. Christmas morning all rushed down and his presents weren't there.

    They went for a walk in the afternoon and santa made a special delivery as he saw how much apologising etc her eldest did.

    Could you maybe do that - so you don't actually cancel christmas altogether?
    Forty and fabulous, well that's what my cards say....
  • cef66 wrote: »
    I'd second 'The empty stocking' - a great story for lots of reasons. You could hear a pin drop when I read it to my year 1 class last week when it came to the bit when Santa left only 1 stocking full of presents. They were all mesmerised till the end. ( It does explain some of the naughtiness too.)

    I'd recommend this book for any child, one of my favourites.

    Try and find something (anything) that he can be good at before the big day and praise him for it.

    The 3 'naughtiest' children in my class found the last week of term very difficult and were even more challenging than usual. They found all the Christmas activities and extras and being off timetable, so no routine, difficult to cope with. It was all too exciting for them. They were better and happier doing handwriting practise than the Christmas worksheets which they just couldn't settle to and I kept up the 1:1 reading which helped.

    I'd keep up your normal home routine as much as you can and lessen all the countdown and 'big day' talk if possible, difficult I know.


    I agree with keeping to routine as much as possible. Christmas is a massive overload for weeks beforehand and some children find it hard to cope.
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