ID for French pension

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  • Newly_retiredNewly_retired Forumite
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    Ha, ha, I volunteer at CAB, and nobody had heard of it.
    I am pretty sure France would not have accepted it.
    Now I know the Town Clerk's signature and stamp are accepted I will go there every year.
  • cheskychesky Forumite
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    Oh, not so, Newly Retired. As I mentioned before, I've been doing it for some of our clients - in fact, a new one has just joined the ranks, bringing the numbers up to 5 or 6. As some of them have been returning for a few years, guess we must be doing it right.
  • Newly_retiredNewly_retired Forumite
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    That's worth knowing, Chesky.
    What sort of rubber stamp do you have? What is the status of the person who signs? None of the ASSs at my bureau seemed to know, though I didn't pursue it as I was sorted with our Town Clerk.
  • cheskychesky Forumite
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    We've just got a very basic rubber stamp with our name and address; any of us complete the form but I think we always get our manager to sign it.

    Must be fairly straightforward but nowadays I simply copy what I did last year!
  • cheskychesky Forumite
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    PS - you also thanked me when I first posted this back in September.
  • angelilangelil Forumite
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    Aware this thread is getting on a bit, but my (French) husband does a lot of EU work and thought he could pass this link on to anyone that it might help with any sort of 'equivalency' problems.

    https://ec.europa.eu/solvit/index_en.htm can be used whenever one European country who has agreed to conform to European regulations has not in fact done so. A friend who now lives in France used it when the UK kindly revoked her driving licence for trying to renew it from France, and was able to get it back with success.
  • edited 2 January 2015 at 9:18PM
    jjlandlordjjlandlord
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    edited 2 January 2015 at 9:18PM
    On thAt basis that's why I opted for the vicar. He had an official church stamp.

    Don't even think of using religious officials for anything official in relation to the French government.

    Religion is a private matter and it has no standing whatsoever.

    The Town Hall would be the place to go in France, so just a stamp from the English version would produce the desired effect.
  • edited 3 January 2015 at 5:33PM
    seven-day-weekendseven-day-weekend Forumite
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    edited 3 January 2015 at 5:33PM
    Savvy_Sue wrote: »
    Yes, do let us know how you get on. We have English friends who live in France, and they say there is the French way of doing things, and the French way of doing things, ie nothing else is acceptable. Nothing else can be considered. Vraiment, you say that some other way exists? No, that cannot be possible. They (the French authority in question) have never heard of any other way of doing things, so it cannot exist.

    I exaggerate slightly, of course, but one year this family were not going to be in the village on the date on which everyone goes to the Mairie to say they'd like their child to have a place in the local school, and gives the date of birth etc. So they went to ask about what to do. Nothing could be done. If they didn't register on that day, they probably wouldn't get a place. No, they couldn't complete the forms beforehand and ask a friend to give them in: they couldn't be given the forms to post, no, there was no other way than to turn up at the Mairie on that date ...

    My friends swore that no school planning would be done until after that date, even if the Mairie knew, for example, that in the previous year the first year had been larger than usual, and was likely to be just as big in future years, they wouldn't plan for any more places than usual in the second year until after everyone had been to the Mairie. Even if they knew - by other means - that there were going to be physically more children than could be fitted into the school, nothing would be done until after Registration Day, at which point the school would go 'zut alors, what shall we do, all these little darlings from Year 1 are going into Year 2, and we can't fit them in, and we have just as many new little darlings arriving for Year 1 ....'

    Madre de Dios, who do they think they are? Spanish?:rotfl::rotfl:
    (AKA HRH_MUngo)
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    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
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