How is everyone's routine?

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  • 1trainer1
    1trainer1 Posts: 1,010 Forumite
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    We dont have much of a routine as my work is flexi so some days I leave home at 08.30 and others I leave at 13.30 but me and the wife work together in most things.


    Our Sarah goes sleep at 10-11 at night and wakes up about 9 in the morning each morning, she has an afternoon nap as well each day.


    If I am off or am working late then I give her a bath, if I'm working early then wife gives her a bath.


    during the day we both feed he when we can and I try to pitch in when I am home so she knows daddy is around.


    we have started introducing her to some solid foods and always try to give her a bit of what we are having to see if she likes it.


    it is interesting but some days I am absolutely shattered whereas other days we have lots of energy and have loads of time for doing our own things
    Blessed on 18th February 2014 at 0814 with little Sarah xxx
  • ViolaLass
    ViolaLass Posts: 5,764 Forumite
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    That study looked at 14 children. I like my science a little more rigorous than that.
  • notanewuser
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    ViolaLass wrote: »
    That study looked at 14 children. I like my science a little more rigorous than that.

    As do I. But it makes sense, doesn't it? I'm not sitting here thinking "surely babies and toddlers function best when forced into unnatural routines that suit adults....." :whistle:
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • thorsoak
    thorsoak Posts: 7,166 Forumite
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    As do I. But it makes sense, doesn't it? I'm not sitting here thinking "surely babies and toddlers function best when forced into unnatural routines that suit adults....." :whistle:

    As babies and toddlers grow up, I've found it easier to adapt their routines into routines which will work when they have to go to playgroup/nursery/school - and when one has more than one toddler/baby, it is important to work out a routine which suits all. Eventually children do need to go to bed earlier, in order to be up fresh and ready for school - those who don't do this often turn out to be the children who do not react well to school - tired in the afternoon, reluctant to get up and get going in the morning.

    It has been my experience that the babies and toddlers who do get used to an earlier bedtime (by 8 o'clock) do settle at school more easily and leads to less stress in the family.
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    thorsoak wrote: »
    As babies and toddlers grow up, I've found it easier to adapt their routines into routines which will work when they have to go to playgroup/nursery/school - and when one has more than one toddler/baby, it is important to work out a routine which suits all. Eventually children do need to go to bed earlier, in order to be up fresh and ready for school - those who don't do this often turn out to be the children who do not react well to school - tired in the afternoon, reluctant to get up and get going in the morning.

    It has been my experience that the babies and toddlers who do get used to an earlier bedtime (by 8 o'clock) do settle at school more easily and leads to less stress in the family.

    My experience differs. Admittedly it's a sample of 1, but DD was never forced into a routine and at 4 is pretty good about going to bed (between 8 and 9pm on week nights) and is up before my 7:45am alarm in the morning (on week days). Yesterday we all slept in till 10am but she was still in bed and asleep by 9pm. She's very content, relaxed and incredibly bright.

    (No child has to go to playgroup, nursery or school. As I said, it's very much an adult construct. ;))

    Again, IME, being able to socialise with DD without having to dash off for bedtime has given her additional confidence and experiences that we consider to be more beneficial to her.

    I know others with the same experience.
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • thorsoak
    thorsoak Posts: 7,166 Forumite
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    Not every parent has the opportunity or desire to home-school. The majority of people live in the Real World, where routines have to be followed.

    However, I bow to your one-child rearing experience - I can only cite 4 children and their children, plus nephews, neices, children attending the playgroup that I run, etc etc etc.
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    thorsoak wrote: »
    Not every parent has the opportunity or desire to home-school. The majority of people live in the Real World, where routines have to be followed.

    However, I bow to your one-child rearing experience - I can only cite 4 children and their children, plus nephews, neices, children attending the playgroup that I run, etc etc etc.

    Ultimately, everyone has to do what works for them. I suspect it's usually the children that compromise more than their parents though, frankly. Humans existed for a long time before formal societal routines came about. We may not have made it this far had early cavemen taken such an approach to raising the next generation.

    Parenting and society have probably changed somewhat since you began your parenting journey. There are many things that parents do these days that I can't understand at all, but they have the right to make their own choices. It doesn't mean it's truly in the child's best interest though. ;)
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
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