Log burning

edited 13 November 2012 at 3:07PM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
27 replies 6.8K views
blue55blue55 Forumite
19 Posts
edited 13 November 2012 at 3:07PM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
Hi - just wondering what people think about burning logs for heating. Most of the logs that I burn are sourced from tree surgeons so not from woodland that is re-planted - however they are delivered from just 10 miles away. If I sourced my fuel from a sustainably (forestry commission) supplier they'd have to be transported from at least 100 miles away.

Any suggestions for how to make my log burning more eco?


[threadbanner]box[/threadbanner]
«13

Replies

  • edited 18 October 2012 at 11:27AM
    zeupaterzeupater Forumite
    5.1K Posts
    Tenth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 18 October 2012 at 11:27AM
    blue55 wrote: »
    Hi - just wondering what people think about burning logs for heating. Most of the logs that I burn are sourced from tree surgeons so not from woodland that is re-planted - however they are delivered from just 10 miles away. If I sourced my fuel from a sustainably (forestry commission) supplier they'd have to be transported from at least 100 miles away.

    Any suggestions for how to make my log burning more eco?
    Hi

    Best advice is to burn the logs in the most efficient way possible - ie burn the logs in an efficient log-burner and only burn logs when they're fully seasoned & dry .... apart from this I don't really understand why you would look at a different source to the one you already have as most tree surgeons only sell logs as a side-line in order to avoid waste-disposal costs as a result of their main business, that being making unsafe trees safe and removing overgrown, potentially property damaging trees. That's probably as 'green' as you can get, burning a waste product.

    HTH
    Z
    "We are what we repeatedly do, excellence then is not an act, but a habit. " ...... Aristotle
    B)
  • blue55blue55 Forumite
    19 Posts
    I guess that if I didn't buy from a tree surgeon the wood would oly go to waste - best do my bit for waste disposal!
  • If your going to burn for heat , I see no problem with burning waste/by product wood, especially if it's locally source.
    I'd agree with Z comments above.
    It's when you're buying wood felled for the purpose of burning that things start to get problematic.
    On a different tilt , there are realistic concerns over reduction in air quality from this recent trend which has increase demand for wood burning and biomass.
    Perhap it's not as good for 'our' environment as many assume, especially in a domestic urban area.

    Ps. I burn waste wood in a small stove for additional heat for my home in the suburbs cheers Jim
  • skivenovskivenov Forumite
    2.2K Posts
    Most of my wood comes out of builders skips. No trees cut down for the purpose of burning, and it cuts down on landfill. :D
    Yes it's overwhelming, but what else can we do?
    Get jobs in offices and wake up for the morning commute?
  • edited 19 October 2012 at 6:16AM
    jamesingramjamesingram Forumite
    301 Posts
    edited 19 October 2012 at 6:16AM
    Same here , but do you burn treated or painted wood ?
    Chrome, copper and ascenic fumes floating around your general location might not be so nice, let alone the concern on air quality from burning even well seasoned wood.
  • skivenovskivenov Forumite
    2.2K Posts
    In the wood burner, yes, because I know it doesn't leak out the door. I'd probably be more reluctant on an open fire.

    That said, my granny used to burn all manner of crap on her fire, she'd had one lung her whole adult life and lived to her 80's, so it might not be that dangerous!
    Yes it's overwhelming, but what else can we do?
    Get jobs in offices and wake up for the morning commute?
  • It might not leak out the stove door much , but then it goes out the chimney and floats around the general area , waiting for you when you go out your door :)
  • EctophileEctophile Forumite
    5.7K Posts
    Tenth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    Wood from tree surgeons would just be dumped if it wasn't for people with wood burners, so that seems ideal to me. I also have no problem with sustainably managed woodland.

    As a nature conservation volunteer, I see the difference in wildlife value between a well-managed woodland with a variety of different tree ages and one that has simply been abandoned.

    I prefer traditionally air-dried seasoned wood to kiln-dried. It makes more sense to just store the wood under cover for a year or two than to cook it in an oven.

    One of the perks of being a conservation volunteer is that some of the unwanted trees that we cut down end up in the back of my car, to be firewood the following year.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • On the other side of drying - a properly designed solar kiln can be a truly excellent way to dry wood.

    As can one using waste wood to dry the rest.
  • Most the waste wood in my area goes to the local CHP biomass plant ,
    Unfortunatley so does some of the locally grow timber ,so less is available for construction or other uses.

    this is worth a look regard local air polution cause by wood burning
    how to reduce it via sensible techniques.
    http://www.baaqmd.gov/Divisions/Communications-and-Outreach/Air-Quality-in-the-Bay-Area/Wood-Burning/Wood-Burning-Rule-Information.aspx
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Bacon flavoured toothpaste

Can you help this Forumite track some down?

Join the Forum discussion

£10 Christmas bonus

For benefits recipients

MSE News