Help please, identify this apple variety

edited 26 September 2012 at 4:14PM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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unhappy_shopperunhappy_shopper Forumite
1.3K Posts
edited 26 September 2012 at 4:14PM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Mortgage: @ Feb. 2007: £133,200; Apr. 2011: £24,373; May 2011: £175,999; Jun 2013: ~£97K; Mar. 2014 £392,212.73; Dec. 2015: £327,051.77; Mar. 2016: ~£480K; Mar. 2017 £444,445.74

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  • blossomhill_2blossomhill_2 Forumite
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    Hi OP - that's a "big ask" - even the apple experts on apple identifaction days can't identify every apple that passes in front of their eyes!

    One question they always ask is do you know when it was planted
    You never know how far-reaching something good, that you may do or say today, may affect the lives of others tomorrow
  • They look similar to what is growing in my garden - William Crump. A lovely apple.

    Just a head's up: my local RHS garden Harlow Carr (near Harrogate) is having a Fruit Identification Day on 25th September http://apps.rhs.org.uk/rhseventfinder/details.aspx?id=9515&r=true You need to take a branch and a fruit along.

    Perhaps other RHS gardens will be doing the same near where you live. Might be worth investigating.
    4.30: conduct pigeon orchestra...
  • RASRAS Forumite
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    Hi

    Look here http://www.fruitid.com/

    I cannot get any idea from the tree photos and you do not indicate where you are in the UK but from the kitchen piccies and knowing that the fruit is still only recently ripe up here,m I think this may be Discovery.

    You are a lucky bunny to have that much fruit on any tree this year but if it is Discovery then it does not keep well - early apples do not as a rule.

    Put some in plastic bags, sealed with a couple of small holes in the sides and they will keep a big longer in the salad drawer.

    Juice the rest.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
  • edited 27 September 2012 at 3:36PM
    unhappy_shopperunhappy_shopper Forumite
    1.3K Posts
    edited 27 September 2012 at 3:36PM
    RAS wrote: »
    Hi

    Look here http://www.fruitid.com/

    I cannot get any idea from the tree photos and you do not indicate where you are in the UK but from the kitchen piccies and knowing that the fruit is still only recently ripe up here,m I think this may be Discovery.

    You are a lucky bunny to have that much fruit on any tree this year but if it is Discovery then it does not keep well - early apples do not as a rule.

    Put some in plastic bags, sealed with a couple of small holes in the sides and they will keep a big longer in the salad drawer.

    Juice the rest.

    Thanks for your help. This apple tree is from our home in Bedfordshire. The apples are ripe and they are falling off the tree. So, I have plucked as many as I could reach and currently the salad drawer of my fridge is full of these. I have made apple sauce and pie filling too and shared quite a few with my neighbours :) Still there is lots left on the tree.
    Mortgage: @ Feb. 2007: £133,200; Apr. 2011: £24,373; May 2011: £175,999; Jun 2013: ~£97K; Mar. 2014 £392,212.73; Dec. 2015: £327,051.77; Mar. 2016: ~£480K; Mar. 2017 £444,445.74
  • RASRAS Forumite
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    In which case the most likely varieity is Discovery.

    That can ripen in mid/late August in a very good year down south. It is normally very ripe here in early September and it is still sitting on a lot of trees.

    Everything is 3-4 weeks late so I think Discovery.

    It is a very common early apple. It is the earliest red apple.
    Other early red apples are not commonly sold as trees and most are too recent to have grown to that size.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
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