veggie plot advise

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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boredjellybeanboredjellybean Forumite
565 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Hi there,

I am after making a little veggie patch in my garden I'e roughly estimated it'll be around 5x3m we are a family of 6 & I wondered what would be the best things to grow? I will also have some space around the garden for pots & I have a separate herb garden

many thanks in advance

Sarah x
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Replies

  • edited 26 June 2012 at 3:39PM
    FarwayFarway Forumite
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    edited 26 June 2012 at 3:39PM
    First thing is only grow what you like to eat, no point growing garlic if everyone hates it

    Second thing, grow what is always expensive to buy but is easy to grow. A few suggestions are

    Rhubarb, really is easy and trouble free
    Runner beans - bit depends where you live, 500 ft up a Scottish mountain is not ideal, sheltered southern Devon hillside, great

    I would avoid spuds, carrots & onions, take up lots of space and are readily & cheaply available

    No doubt others will chip in soon

    PS, I assume the family has young children? If so get them to grow something, like radishes to get them started in the food production process of finding out how it grows and does not arrive on their plate by magic.

    Tomatoes would be good too, but unless you can find plants it may be too late for this year

    PPS - Again geographic location is important, but have you space for a large [at least 2 ft X 2 ft] pot to grow a fig in? You will not find many fresh figs for sale, and a fresh sun warmed one will make you wonder why you never grew them before, and they are fairly care & pest free

    I have a 3 year old fig, in pot, 15 ripening figs on it [Hampshire]
  • wogglemakerwogglemaker Forumite
    399 Posts
    Farway wrote: »

    PPS - Again geographic location is important, but have you space for a large [at least 2 ft X 2 ft] pot to grow a fig in? You will not find many fresh figs for sale, and a fresh sun warmed one will make you wonder why you never grew them before, and they are fairly care & pest free

    I have a 3 year old fig, in pot, 15 ripening figs on it [Hampshire]

    What type of Fig do you grow? We're looking to add to our revamped (and productive) gaden
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]It matters not if you try and fail, and fail and try again;[/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]But it matters much if you try and fail, and fail to try again.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Stick to it by R B Stanfield
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  • thanks Farway - we live in Suffolk & yes the 6 of us includes 4 little ones, they are looking forward to helping so I'd like to grow a few easy things for them maybe a few carrots & lettuces, a fig tree however wouldn't be worth it as mine don't like them - we have a small apple tree in a large container though due to me being a bad gardener early in the year it has no fruit this year

    Does anyone have any advise on what grows well in containers as we have a good space along the side of the house that is just full of weeds & I feel it could be a growing area but its also a driveway so I'd like the protection of containers lol
  • wheels28wheels28 Forumite
    42 Posts
    growing what you like is important, this is only my second year of growing my own but most things have grown ok for me, I've grown little carrots in containers last year they were brilliant this year not so good I've also but lettuce in ittle trays and just picked the leaves as I've wanted them which has worked well for me, last year I grew them in beds and had loads of wastage. I send for free seeds all the time when ever I see them. The only seeds I've bought are broad beans, peas and parsnips because we realy like them. Last year I had free Khol rabi seeds I planted all of them (beginners mistake, only plant what you might need and keep the rest for next year) only to find out that none of us like them, so won't be doing that again. Good luck with your growning.
  • rabidbunrabidbun Forumite
    321 Posts
    For fruit we have most harvest from raspberries and strawberries if you can find a small corner (our blackberries grow well up a fence too). For veggies outdoors I like chard, climbing french beans, "Red Alert" bush tomatoes and little clumps of spring onions (started as pinches of seeds in pots). We grow salad in pots mostly, also as plug plant transplant where there's room.
  • edited 27 June 2012 at 3:09PM
    FarwayFarway Forumite
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    edited 27 June 2012 at 3:09PM
    What type of Fig do you grow? We're looking to add to our revamped (and productive) gaden

    Not sure, it was from Lidl and the variety was not stated

    However when I compared the fruits with on line pictures I think it is Brunswick

    If I were doing it again I think I would get one I knew the name of, but it is tempting in Lidl & Wilkinson's isn't it?

    PS, My local Lidl has fig plants in stock at the moment, but may not be nationwide
  • ALIBOBSYALIBOBSY Forumite
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    I think the advice so far is good. Some stuff like onions, potatos, rice wheat etc. the sort of main carbs we all eat on the whole are cheap to buy and so not worth growing.
    Except for perhaps growing a small amount of new potatos (the taste is gorgeous), best to focus on what you can grow in the area you have.

    I also try to take a bit of a cottage garden method with our garden so edibles are mixed in with the other plants. Globe artichokes look fab, there are loads of edible flowers as well. You can also stick fruit bushes radomly around the garden. As well as little clumps of herbs or salad leaves in amongst the other plants.

    You can grow stuff not widely available in the shops such as coloured carrots, little round carrots, golden beetroot, raddish flowers and pods, pea shoots, kohl rabi etc. All lovely and tasty and easy/quick to grow. Salad leaves are so easy and cheap its unreal. Spring onions are also quick and easy. I am a fan of chard, and of course beans are great (all the different types).

    If there is a lack of space you plan to ensure as one crop ends more seedlings are ready to follow on even more than on other plots-google square foot gardening about maximising plot returns. You also grow upwards, runner beans, cukes, squashes etc. PLus don't forget how much stuff can be grown in pots. Some stuff is fab homegrown-like broad beans and miles better than the shop bought stuff.

    Most of all enjoy it it gets very addictive lol.
    "Overthinking every little thing
    Acknowledge the bell you cant unring"

  • Some great advice in this thread! Thanks
  • Lotus-eaterLotus-eater Forumite
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    You have limited space and alot of mouths to feed.

    Firstly I'd agree with the above, grow what you like to eat.

    Crops I would consider valuable enough to grow in a small space.

    Carrots
    Salad, lettuce (various types)/rocket etc
    radish
    Cucumbers
    Courgettes
    Runner/french beans
    mangetout

    Then see what space you have left.

    Grow the rhubarb somewhere else, it takes up too much space.
    Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes.
  • edited 28 June 2012 at 10:02AM
    notatvstarnotatvstar Forumite
    181 Posts
    edited 28 June 2012 at 10:02AM
    I've got some Chinese sprouting broccoli that's proving to be good value. Each plant needs a bit of space though, but it's a 'cut and come again'. Already we've had 2 harvests from our 5 plants (a meal for 2 per harvest) and LOTS more sprouts on the way (scary actually) so I'm thinking perhaps 5 was a bit excessive for the 2 of us. We should be having sprouting broccoli once a week until the Autumn I hope. Peas, beans (any legume) are also good value in terms of space. If needs be, these can be grown in pots and you don't actually need THAT many for a constant crop that's enough for dinner (just have to be efficient with beans and serial sow for peas). I agree with the globe artichoke idea as well. I have 2yr old plant (with suckers!) that has 3 heads already. But these do need space as they cover a lot of ground and they are a commitment as it's a perennial (like rhubarb) and so it's best they have a permanent home (not necessary, but better). One or two plants will be fine for a family, so I'm thinking of sub-dividing next year and giving away the suckers I don't need as pressies... Also - I've got in 3 sprout plants for Christmas (one for us, 2 to be pressies). These are also great value as when they're ready (late Nov/early Dec) you can harvest the big sprouts at the bottom, leaving the smaller ones for later.

    I also agree with the notion that it's only worth growing stuff that you can't get in shops (peas are the exception as fresh peas are incomparable). Also - I'm a HUGE believer in heritage potatoes. A bit of an indulgence - but I like growing differently coloured things. (I have purple, yellow, white and bright red carrots in at the moment, also a pink cauliflower and a green one). I like to grow the blue, red and purple spuds (any variety - just as long as it's a different colour!). Gorw pots in bags to save space and make earthing up really easy. We've also just had our first harvest of golden beetroot... amazing roasted :). We're seeding more over the weekend.

    We've also got turnips and I've been eating the leaves (as well as the beetroot leaves) as they're similar to chard. So don't forget the other parts of the plants too (the tops of peas - peas shoots - are also good)... but defo... DO NOT EAT RHUBARB LEAVES. Not good. Death will just ruin your day, so please check stuff out before you nibble.

    Boyf likes to waste space and grow what I refer to as his 'Man-plants'. This year it's sweetcorn and onions, celery and leaks.

    ... also courgettes. one or 2 plants will definitely do a family. Plant any more and you may regret it...
    Good luck!
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