School transport

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
21 replies 2.3K views
wheezywheezy Forumite
46 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
My DD is 10 and has 'profound and complex' learning difficulties. We are looking at secondary school and the nearest mainstream school is 4 1/2 miles away. The village children are taken and returned by the school bus every day.

It has been suggested to me by an advisory teacher that I should take and collect her everyday as she may not be able to manage the bus. She has even got lost in her v small village primary after being there for 6 years! She had to ask for help to find the way out.

I feel that this is unfair as the other children receive free transport and we would have to pay for the 18 mile round trip ourselves for the next 5 to 6 years. I just wondered what other people think? Am I expecting too much?

Why is everything designed to make life more complicated:mad:
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Replies

  • Just want to state that I don' t expect my daughter to be able to cope on her own getting to/from bus. Not even certain she could manage being on the bus!
  • kingfisherbluekingfisherblue Forumite
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    Ask the school transport section at your local council if she is eligible for free transport (taxi or minibus) due to her learning difficulties
  • vanillavanilla Forumite
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    As someone else said speak to the transport end. They may provide free transport or they will gave you a payment for leaving your child to school and collecting them again. I left my daughter to school every day and the school was about 3 miles away (she wasn't allowed on the school bus because she couldn't manage it, needed help to get in and out of the car). I needed to get a form signed by the school of how many days she was there, then the transport would pay so much per mile.
    She has now moved to a different school which is about 40 miles away and the transport provided her with a taxi each day.
    Sometimes it seems that the going is just too rough.
    And things go wrong no matter what I do.
    Now and then it seems that life is just too much.
    But you've got the love I need to see me through.
    :j :j
  • Parent partnership had been looking into that and also asked me if I could do the transport. The policy states over 3 miles for county provided transport but no specifics about special needs/statemented children.
  • I presume he has a statement of special educational needs? I believe if the school is mentioned in her statement they will have to provide suitable transport for her to get there and back MIC
  • ' I am 'Profound and have complex' learning difficulties'' and I shouldn't go out alone Huh !!!!!!!!!

    Is what you mean.
  • No I don't allow my daughter out alone but I am frightened that this is what will be expected when she moves schools. I believe she will need an escort/taxi. I'm posting to find out what other people think of the situation.
    Thanks MIC but she is still in Year 5 and we were told that we need to start looking at transition due to her needs so the statement still names her primary school.
    What would happen if we couldn't afford to run the car to get her to school?
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    My daughter was around 13-14 when she got transport to school and later college, she is physically disabled but does walk aided albeit not very far. We wasnt all that far away from either 1 1/2 miles. The local authority provided a taxi and we paid some of the cost, at the start the authority made sure taxi was shared but for some reason I cant now recall she went on here own. Maybe its different where you are but they did pay for her for several years. She didn't have a escort at all. I use to do voluntary work and I acted a a escort for some kids to school with local dial a ride as they had some contract with county council
  • sunnyonesunnyone Forumite
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    wheezy wrote: »
    No I don't allow my daughter out alone but I am frightened that this is what will be expected when she moves schools. I believe she will need an escort/taxi. I'm posting to find out what other people think of the situation.
    Thanks MIC but she is still in Year 5 and we were told that we need to start looking at transition due to her needs so the statement still names her primary school.
    What would happen if we couldn't afford to run the car to get her to school?

    Your daughter has REAL 'profound and complex' learning difficulties and is statmented which makes a change from many of the parents that have posted on this board recently :D and as such you have the right to make sure that she is provided with safe and secure transport to school to keep her safe, the LA must provide her with that help in line with her statement and also in line with what the people involved in her care says that she needs, I wouldnt accept less than that.
  • kingfisherbluekingfisherblue Forumite
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    Sorry, had to run out earlier. As I said, contact the education transport section of your council. You could also speak to someone who deals with statements for advice. As your daughter has a statement, when it is updated to name her secondary school, you should be able to get transport for her.

    If there are others who live close enough to you and attend the same school, your daughter might be on a minibus or in a shared taxi. Otherwise, if she is the only child in the area who needs special transport for that school, she is likely to be in a taxi on her own - the taxi driver will have enhanced CRB Disclosure and it is likely to be the same driver every day.

    Transition does start in year 5 for children with statements. You should have a regular review, followed by a transition review (my son's primary tried to get away with just a transition review, but an inclusion oficer attended at my request and the SENCO was told, quite clearly, that she could not adjust the rules to suit herself). In the reviews, mention that you have concerns about transport and what is expected - this should then be minuted and acted upon.

    Also, don't just accept that the nearest mainstream school iss the right one for your daughter. Have a look at any that are reasonable to get to. I made the decision for my son to go from mainstream primary into a special school when he went into year 7 - he wouldn't have managed in mainstream secondary. However, I know of other children who have not gone into special school, but who attend a school that is best for their needs - and it isn't always the nearest school. Somebody I know lives about half a mile from a mainstream secondary school, with a good reputation for children with autism - it has a special unit, but the pupils join mainstream pupils in art, PE, etc. She looked at this school, among others, but did not feel that it was the right school for her son. She had decided on special school, but was advised by Parent Partnership to look round a school on the other side of town, about five or six miles away. The child now attends that school and has a taxi provided each day.
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