mobility component of disability living allowance

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
6 replies 1.9K views
covlasscovlass Forumite
562 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
" I would not change you for the world, but I would change the world for you"
Proud to be parent of a child with Autism:D

When I see your face there's not a thing that I would change 'cause your amazing just the way you are

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  • edited 29 November 2011 at 7:21PM
    akabeeakabee Forumite
    972 Posts
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    edited 29 November 2011 at 7:21PM
    Fixed your link:)
    http://www.mencap.org.uk/news/article/news-thousands-disabled-people-will-no-longer-lose-mobility-component-disability-living-allowance

    This only effects people in residential care
    According to The Times, the Government has announced that it will not go ahead with previous plans to remove the mobility component of Personal Independence Payment (PIP), which is replacing Disability Living Allowance, from people living in residential care
  • But around 70% of mobility awards under the DLA system will get nothing when PIP comes in in 2013
  • Scary stuff - where did you hear this?
  • Al_Mitch wrote: »
    But around 70% of mobility awards under the DLA system will get nothing when PIP comes in in 2013


    Are you basing this on the way ESA has gone? I can see from what I have read, unless you have walking (wheelchair) difficulties, you will not get HRM, so I assume this is what you are on about.

    It will if is the case cut the amount of blue badges in circulation right down and that will free up a lot of parking spaces.
  • Brassedoff wrote: »
    Are you basing this on the way ESA has gone? I can see from what I have read, unless you have walking (wheelchair) difficulties, you will not get HRM, so I assume this is what you are on about.

    It will if is the case cut the amount of blue badges in circulation right down and that will free up a lot of parking spaces.

    In a way I agree with you. The scenarios that now exist that entitle someone to High Mobility have grown out of proportion to what was initially envisaged when DLA was first brought out.

    Going back to those views 'unless you have walking (wheelchair) difficulties, you will not get HRM' is in my opinion a good thing.

    Sticking to the simple facts of NOT being able to walk or mobilise AT ALL is the way forward. Using aids and adaptions to enable someone to walk should also be refused the benefit.

    I do realise and accept that my son will probably lose his award when PIP comes into being, but if that is the case and it solves the abuse that is so rife, then I am well prepared to accept that situation.
    What annoys me is when I see and hear about some claimants with dubious conditions getting High Mobility it is making a mockery of the system. They should be kicked off it.
  • I'm coming from a slightly different position - awaiting a medical for DLA - HRM, amongst others.

    On rare days, I can run a hundred meters, or two.
    This, however hasn't happened in the last 5 years.
    A couple of days a week, I struggle getting to the loo most of the time, and don't move off the sofa, as it's too risky, and I'm too weak.
    Most of the remainder of the time, I can't walk 30m without 'severe discomfort', and risking relapse if I actually do it more than once.

    Some disabilities are not as easy to define as simply needing to use a wheelchair, yet lead to real mobility issues.

    If it'd cure my CFS, I'd be bloody tempted to cut my legs off tomorrow.

    In addition.
    Do not believe what you read in the papers.
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