growing suitable herbs for chinese cooking

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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carolbeecarolbee Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
we had some lemon grass in a recipe we did at the weekend. has anyone grown this and any tips? the seeds are quite expensive although not compared with buying a stalk or two!

we have a greenhouse so can grow under cover

any other reccommendations for tasty dinners?
Carolbee
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Replies

  • If you still have a stalk of lemon grass, you can try what I have done before.

    Indoorrs in a warm place, put the stalk in a glass of water, keep the water fresh, but it should start to grow roots within a week or so. When it does, pot it up (I put mine in a 7"ish pot), and it will grow, and ultimately multiply.

    You should keep it frost free by bringing it indoors over the winter - it likes warm and humid...... bathroom? kitchen?

    I have never grown it from seed, and would be interested in other people who have tried this.

    Coriander from seed is fairly straightforward too....

    :dance:
  • carolbeecarolbee Forumite
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    thanks for that, does it grow a bit like chives?
    Carolbee
  • It throws up 'blades', and then extra ones form around it to create the stalk that you will be used to useing. once it is growing well, you cut the blade out just below the soil (taking the outer blades first apparently)
  • I have never tried it, but *apparently* you can grow coriander from 'coriander seed' that you might find in your spice cupboard - I might have thought the seed would be to dry, but apparently not!
    I grow so much of this, i work from traditional seed packets!
  • carolbeecarolbee Forumite
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    I never thought of that!

    there am I buying packets of seeds to grow and packets of seed to cook with from our local health shop!

    got some basil on the go, on the window sill and bought some B&Q 39p seeds yesterday, the value ones, beetroot and lettuce.tried them a couple of years ago and they are wonderful.
    Carolbee
  • If you really like chinese/oriental cooking, then look out for other varieties of basil - Thai basil is *wonderful* tastes very different from genovese.... also, holy basil or lemon basil if you can find them...
  • carolbeecarolbee Forumite
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    you certainly are living up to your user name. I am off to the garden centre tomorrow - again - to have a look for these. can see what I will be doing at the weekend. have you got a big garden?
    Carolbee
  • thank you, but not really, no.

    I have half an allotment (1 yr now)in which i grow things that can cope with being ignored (potatoes, squash, beans for drying etc) and the rest I do at home. I only started 18mths ago with 'square foot gardening' - i had 1mx1m and grew enormous amounts of veg/herbs etc, so I got the bug.... pots everywhere and now a small glasshouse :D

    I would rather grow a small amount of loads of things than a lot of a few things - that way I get a bit of everything and find out what works best!

    :dance:
  • Raspberry_SwirlRaspberry_Swirl Forumite
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    i love oriental food and cooking but can't for the life of me grow herbs!!!
    tried growing basil and corriander last year and as soon as they got to about 4 inches high they wilted and died.

    any ideas what i'm doing wrong?
    i started the seeds off in a plastic greenhouse thing, and then once they were mature enough i put them outside, but not in direct sunlight.
  • did you keep them in pots outside, or in the soil...... ?

    if they were in pots, it sounds like they were either over watered, or (more likely) underwatered... (they wilt with underwatering)

    if they were in the soil, they usually like poor soil (not too rich) with lots of drainage (or they can get waterlogged)....imagine them growing on a hot italian hillside....dreadful soil, but great drainage!

    actually, I'm imagining being stranded on an italian hillside right now.........

    :dance:
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