We'd like to remind Forumites to please avoid political debate on the Forum. This is to keep it a safe and useful space for MoneySaving discussions. Threads that are - or become - political in nature may be removed in line with the Forum’s rules. Thank you for your understanding.

MSE News: High energy costs force elderly to cut food spending

Options
2»

Comments

  • Widelats
    Widelats Posts: 3,773 Forumite
    Options
    I don't know about scare mongering or reactionary because it's a true piece of writing as far as I can see, my quibble with it is, as above, why just the elderly? Every day people will have to think about whether they should turn on the heat. It's not an exaggerated piece by any means because I believe many people will cut back on their food shopping budget to accommodate a really cold winter month.

    You have really to be around the elderly to know why, old people don't get out much, they sit in their house and sitting around even in summer gets cold, me and you can go out and do stuff, the elderly more than not have mobility problems are their bodies are nowhere near as efficient as ours at staying warm - now in winter it gets really cold, so cold that they are often on the news, in the papers etc "Elderly couple freeze to death in own home" or the awful one here just last winter "Elderly woman freezes to death in garden" all she did was try to put her bin out on the path, but it was so cold she dropped down where she was right outside her door and froze to death.

    They can't have it both ways, they can really not afford to heat a house or home for long periods and get out to buy food as well, but people like yourself don't see it, i dunno what kim yeovil said but it will be defending the energy companies, i think shes gunning for a job or some discounts from them.

    Why just the elderly? Because me and you can get out and don't have to turn on the heating like they do, i can't afford energy prices i get out a lot and hammer the bills down.
    Owed out = lots. :cool:
  • mel12
    mel12 Posts: 298 Forumite
    Options
    short term we need to consider how winter fuel payments etc can be made more effective so noone is having to go cold.

    Long term the high energy prices is just going to get worse I think we need to invest hugely in renewables and energy efficency (home insulation etc).
    Only after the last tree has been cut down,
    Only after the last river has been poisoned,
    Only after the last fish has been caught,
    Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten
  • Greenqueen_2
    Greenqueen_2 Posts: 402 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary
    Options
    KimYeovil wrote: »
    'Force'? In what way are they 'forced' to choose.

    A single pensioner receives £600 per month. A couple receive £910 per month. This is on top of housing allowances. Can someone please explain to me why £600 is not more than enough to eat, heat and participate in society?

    Unemployed or redundant older people between 50 and 65 may have troubles juggling bills but can someone please explain why a single pensioner with an income of £600 is in trouble. £150 for heating, £150 for food - that leaves £300. £100 for other incidental bills - that's £200 left over. And I am overestimating the heating/fuels bills.




    I don`t know where you get these figures from. My OH is shortly going to get his pension of £104 per week. (£450 per month). I am not yet of retirement age so he does not get the couples rate. I have no income (having been made redundant at Christmas) but the DHSS say i am not entitled to anything because i have savings. The income from this is negligible at current interest rates.
    Our current power bill before price rise is £27 per week, food comes to around £30. we still have to pay council tax, water rates, ground rent, insurance, TV license, transport costs etc. Something has to give somewhere.
  • 69chick
    69chick Posts: 544 Forumite
    Options
    My parents in law get some sort of deal with their fuel bills where they work out the size of the house etc.and charge them a fixed monthly amount, they can then have their heating on all day if they wished without paying any more for it (although it does get reviewed each year but at least they don't build up a debt) they are both in their 70's

    without wanting to get too involved in the debate, I do remember about 25 years ago when I was a teenager and involved in a church group we had a visit from help the aged who said then that the elderly do often have to decide whether to eat or turn the heating on (not saying thats right but just remember thinking about it at the time) so maybe not changed as much as we think....also agree that the elderly do need more heat to keep warm and think this is the biggest problem....
    Starting with Avon C6 target sales £150.00
  • xAlisonx
    xAlisonx Posts: 30 Forumite
    Options
    Greenqueen wrote: »
    I don`t know where you get these figures from. My OH is shortly going to get his pension of £104 per week. (£450 per month). I am not yet of retirement age so he does not get the couples rate. I have no income (having been made redundant at Christmas) but the DHSS say i am not entitled to anything because i have savings. The income from this is negligible at current interest rates.
    Our current power bill before price rise is £27 per week, food comes to around £30. we still have to pay council tax, water rates, ground rent, insurance, TV license, transport costs etc. Something has to give somewhere.

    Hi I just wanted to ask you if your OH has investigated the possibility of getting pension tax credits as he's the only one bringing money into the house right now. I know my mum was only due to get a pension of around £103 a week but I'm pretty sure pension tax credits topped this up to just over £130 a week. She also gets her ground rent paid and her council tax. I hope you manage to get something sorted.

    On another note, I was surprised by some of the comments by other posters on here saying that people should manage on their pensions. My mum really struggles and does have to think hard about how long she heats her home for in winter and what food she buys, there is nothing left for 'luxuries' believe me!!!!!
  • A_Flock_Of_Sheep
    A_Flock_Of_Sheep Posts: 5,332 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker PPI Party Pooper
    edited 12 June 2011 at 5:42PM
    Options
    Greenqueen wrote: »
    the DHSS say i am not entitled to anything because i have savings. The income from this is negligible at current interest rates. Our current power bill before price rise is £27 per week, food comes to around £30. we still have to pay council tax, water rates, ground rent, insurance, TV license, transport costs etc. Something has to give somewhere.

    Sounds to me like your savings need to give until you are down to the limit where the DHSS will begin paying you. Or are you of the ilk that the DHSS should pay you while you keep 1,000s squirreled away. It must be 1,000s as I think the upper limit before DHSS will stop paying is £6,000

    What's the point of stockpiling savings if you are not going to use them for the rainy days that they are intended for?
This discussion has been closed.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 12 Election 2024: The MSE Leaders' Debate
  • 344.2K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.4K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450.1K Spending & Discounts
  • 236.3K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 609.7K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.6K Life & Family
  • 248.9K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards