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Window Locks-whats the point.

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Window Locks-whats the point.

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Praise, Vent & Warnings
25 replies 6.9K views
roddydogsroddydogs Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Praise, Vent & Warnings
Insurance companies make a big deal out of "Have you got window Locks", but you cant open a window from outside even if its unlocked, if a burglar can open your windows, hes already inside anyway?
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  • missilemissile Forumite
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    It is an added security feature. Thief could break the glass or force the catch.

    Locks do seem pointless in my case. It would have to be one very brave / deperate cat burglar to climb to the sixth floor!
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  • Dave101tDave101t Forumite
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    so whats the point of a front door lock? they can kick down the door the same way they can break in a window....
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  • dacouchdacouch Forumite
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    Insurers like window locks because they reduce the chances of someone breaking in as they cannot just break the glass and open the window, in addition they have the major benefit of meaning that if someone does break in they cannot then open the biggest window (As it is locked) and climb out with their swag. This generally limited them to taking smaller items and / or a small bag of items.

    Obviously this hinges on you have dead locks on the doors eg doors that cannot be opened from the inside without the key.

    It is worth noting that in many cases the discount you get for having the correct door and window locks is tiny eg on a building and contents premium of say £250 it will often save only £3 or £4 a year. But for having this discount you are normally agreeing to use the locks whenever you go out and in some cases even when you are in the house and have gone to bed for you to have theft cover. In most cases I recommend my clients not to take the discount.
  • edited 11 December 2010 at 10:43AM
    clemmatisclemmatis Forumite
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    edited 11 December 2010 at 10:43AM
    My insurers won't cover for contents etc. -- have a clause saying they won't pay out -- unless acceptable locks (BS) are fitted on all windows accessible from ground level and acceptable locks (specified) are fitted to both front and back doors.
    Luckily all that stuff was here before I moved in. But having to keep the small top ground floor windows (top of bay window) locked, is ridiculous. I can though see these insurers arguing they are "accessible"... .
    (I can't change insurers. The house is subsiding. I could get a contents-only policy from elsewhere but they're expensive.)
  • Makes me chuckle how insurers ask you to confirm that your locks conform to BS blah blah blah. I've no idea really. I assume they do as they are fairly new.
  • roddydogsroddydogs Forumite
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    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?
  • marleyboymarleyboy Forumite
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    roddydogs wrote: »
    Insurance companies make a big deal out of "Have you got window Locks", but you cant open a window from outside even if its unlocked, if a burglar can open your windows, hes already inside anyway?
    Not so, a window can easily be pried open with a screw driver if it is not locked, all it takes is the equivalent of a metal rod, pushed within the frame its able to reach the window arm, then its a simple case of popping the arm off its rest and your window is open. In some cases a quick bump of the frame is enough to dislodge a window arm and "unhinge" it from its rest.

    Insurance companies can refuse to pay out if no window locks are fitted, due to the ease of opening a window that is in effect, unlocked.

    To the insurance company, its the equivalent of leaving your car keys in the ignition and hoping that by closing the car door, nobody will notice.
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  • RolandtheroadieRolandtheroadie Forumite
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    roddydogs wrote: »
    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?

    Surprise surprise, ask Cilla Black.
    http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-7348016-cilla-black-1631m-insurance-blow.do
  • dacouchdacouch Forumite
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    Makes me chuckle how insurers ask you to confirm that your locks conform to BS blah blah blah. I've no idea really. I assume they do as they are fairly new.

    It's easy to see if your door lock conforms to the British Standard, if it does then it will have the kite mark and the relevant BS number on the plate where the mortice comes out.
  • dacouchdacouch Forumite
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    roddydogs wrote: »
    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?

    It depends on the Insurer, as a general rule most will insist on the locks being applied if you have taken a discount for them. (It does vary from company to company though).

    In some areas eg London etc Insurers will insist you have certain types of locks and window locks.

    You can normally see if it is a requirement of your policy by looking at your schedule for a note on you using locks or in the policy booklet.

    In theory if the locks are not a requirement of your policy and / or you have not taken a discount for them. Then if you forgot to lock your door and went out your claim could be paid depending on the exact circumstances
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