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Old British Coins - What to do with them??

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Old British Coins - What to do with them??

edited 30 November -1 at 12:00AM in Boost Your Income
12 replies 47.6K views
bella2121bella2121 Forumite
1.6K posts
edited 30 November -1 at 12:00AM in Boost Your Income
Hope someone can help. My Grandad gave me a tin of old british coins, I dont believe any of them to be of major value, I have looked on the net and nothing jumps out. However they are just sat in a cupboard doing nothing. Anyone any ideas what to do with them, can you cash old coins in?

Thanks in advance :)
***** on the road to debt freedom *****

Baby girl due September 2013
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Replies

  • SailorSamSailorSam Forumite
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    Put them in a picture frame and make a wall display.
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
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    AFAIK you can't cash them in.
  • lilac_ladylilac_lady Forumite
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    Keep them for children/grandchildren's show and tell day at school.

    Use them as stakes in family card games. Money goes back in the tin at the end of the games.
    " The greatest wealth is to live content with little."

    Plato


  • bella2121bella2121 Forumite
    1.6K posts
    Thanks for your replies i'll bear them in mind, there are literally loads and they weigh a ton! lol can you weigh them in as scrap metal i wonder? :)
    ***** on the road to debt freedom *****

    Baby girl due September 2013
  • edited 7 December 2010 at 11:00PM
    SailorSamSailorSam Forumite
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    edited 7 December 2010 at 11:00PM
    Can you weld ?
    If there's loads of them instead of a picture frame display, could you design some sort of sculpture.
    Maybe even super-glue them together, or if you have a glass coffee table put them under the glass.

    This is the sort of thing i was thinking about, just to give you some ideas

    Gifts - perfect gift
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
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    bella2121 wrote: »
    Thanks for your replies i'll bear them in mind, there are literally loads and they weigh a ton! lol can you weigh them in as scrap metal i wonder? :)

    I'm sure i've seen people selling coins by weight on ebay. Sort of along the lines of 1kg of mixed coins, all British and in various denominations.

    I doubt you'd get much for them, but if you look on ebay and find the smallest weights selling, then divide your coins into that weight you might get enough to make it worth it.

    Personally I would just dig a deep hole and bury them, it might make someone happy in a thousand years time.

    But if I was going to go to all that effort I'd really have a laugh doing it. I'd do things like;

    I'd buy a load of cheap spoons, find a nice field and bury 1 spoon and two pennies in the same hole, I'd do this many times all over the field. Then bury 1 spoon with 20 pennies and pee myself laughing at the thought of the archaeologists trying to work it out in a thousand years.

    "We don't know what the connection between spoons and pennies was, but we think they worshipped spoons because they buried them with two pennies. And this spoon must be very special, because it was buried with twenty pennies."
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
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    Another idea, back in the late 70's my sister got a necklace for her 18th birthday, it was made from 18 sixpences, one minted in each year she'd been alive.

    Maybe drill a small hole in a coin, add a chain, and sell it to someone who was born the year it was minted.
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
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    Just done a search on ebay for "1959 coin", because that's the year i was born.

    Came up with loads of auctions but look at this

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/1959-Birth-Year-HaPenny-Coin-Birthday-Keyring-Gift-/320492133033?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item4a9ed1daa9

    Not a lot of money but he's sold 6 so far.

    The search I did threw up loads of things, coins made into pendants, necklaces, cufflinks, bookmarks etc.

    I thought old coins were worthless, unless they were special. But it seems they can be worth something to the person who was born in the year they were minted if you can turn them into something useful/decorative.
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
  • There is one old penny that's very valuable because only a small amount were minted. The date is 1933.

    http://www.2-clicks-coins.com/article/rare-british-coins.html

    I remember using old money before decimalisation. Sixpence (6d - equal to 2 1/2p these days) bought all my comics for the week plus a huge bag of sweets - and I still had change.

    When the government of the time change to decimalisation we suddenly went from 240 pennies to the pound to 100 pence to the pound - yet they said it wouldn't fuel inflation.

    The day after decimalisation my friend and I went to the ice rink. In old money it cost 2/6d (half crown), equal to 12 1/2p to get in and 6d, equal to 2 1/2p to hire our skates. We found the cost had gone up to 15p (3/-) and 5p (1/- that is one shilling). We didn't have enough money so went home very disappointed and more than a bit angry.

    Even as 14 year olds, it was obvious that overnight inflation was going to spiral, which it did.

    I still convert into "old" (REAL) money even at the present day.

    I also refuse to use metric measures as being taught in Imperial measures I utterly detest metric.
  • scotsbobscotsbob Forumite
    4.6K posts
    Check the silver ones, especially those minted before 1947, they have a high silver content and will sell easily.

    One dealer is currently paying £18.70 for £1 face value.
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