We'd like to remind Forumites to please avoid political debate on the Forum. This is to keep it a safe and useful space for MoneySaving discussions. Threads that are - or become - political in nature may be removed in line with the Forum’s rules. Thank you for your understanding.

What counts as child poverty in the UK? Poll discussion

Options
Poll Started 23 November 2010:

What counts as child poverty in the UK?


We’re working with Save the Children on this, and it’s a tougher question than you think. The EU defines it as a household with under 60% of median average income – yet that means as society gets richer, what counts as poverty rises too, which could lead to some relatively rich poor people. Others say no food, shelter or clothing is a better, absolute measure.

Please select ALL you think count as poverty

A. A lack of food, shelter or clothing
B. Family income below £12,700 a year (60% of the average)
C. A home with no heating
D. Parents can’t afford to save £10+ a month for rainy days/retirement
E. A child without their own bed
F. No access to school trips (though often schools will subsidise)
G. A family income below £10,500 a year (50% of the average)
H. Parents regularly behind with paying household bills
I. No TV
J. A child sharing a room with someone of different gender
K. No annual holiday
L. No laptop or internet access
M. Kids that get free school meals

Please vote here, or click 'post reply' to discuss below. Thanks
Former MSE team member
«13456718

Comments

  • Budget_mum
    Options
    "L. No laptop or internet access"

    At the time of posting 57 people voted this as child poverty. It beggars belief.
  • Kimitatsu
    Kimitatsu Posts: 3,894 Forumite
    Options
    Budget_mum wrote: »
    "L. No laptop or internet access"

    At the time of posting 57 people voted this as child poverty. It beggars belief.

    But the majority of secondary schools ASSUME that a child has internet access and set homework accordingly. We live in a very rural area, our nearest library is 8 miles away, the bus leaves 10 minutes after school has finished.....no internet access would seriously affect their schooling.

    "poverty" is not just about clothes and a roof over their head, it is much broader than that and covers how their future life can be affected.
    Free/impartial debt advice: Consumer Credit Counselling Service (CCCS) | National Debtline | Find your local CAB
  • Hezzy
    Hezzy Posts: 90 Forumite
    Options
    My mum raised my brother and I on an annual income of less than £12,000. I grew up being extremely grateful of what I got, despite not having the 'cool' toys my friends had. From what I remember, I had a very happy childhood...looking back, still don't regard it as 'poverty'. My mum must be awesome at budgetting ;)
    *CC PPI Claimed - £136.67* :)
    CC1 - £[STRIKE]797.60[/STRIKE] [STRIKE] 438.17[/STRIKE] [STRIKE]937.92[/STRIKE] [STRIKE]734.63[/STRIKE] 3963.17 CC2 - [STRIKE]£960.09[/STRIKE] CC3 - [STRIKE]£390.51[/STRIKE]
    Overdraft - £[STRIKE]1600[/STRIKE] 600
    Student Loan - Ha!
    :rotfl:
  • popsicat
    Options
    One I struggle with is

    A child sharing a room with someone of different gender

    If you are an owner occupier of a two bed house you take your chance when you have a second child

    If the family is on benefits and renting I believe they can get rehoused once the children are a certain age

    Personal choice can lead to poverty using this definition!
    If you can't take responsibility for it, you'll always be a victim.

    Richard Bach

  • keycamp-reveller
    Options
    Kimitatsu wrote: »
    But the majority of secondary schools ASSUME that a child has internet access and set homework accordingly. We live in a very rural area, our nearest library is 8 miles away, the bus leaves 10 minutes after school has finished.....no internet access would seriously affect their schooling.

    "poverty" is not just about clothes and a roof over their head, it is much broader than that and covers how their future life can be affected.

    But it is not poverty, is it? It may be a slight disadvantage but it definitely is not poverty. This can be circumvented as libraries are open on Saturdays too


    Keycamp-Reveller :cool:
    Find me on TA too
  • MSE_Martin
    MSE_Martin Posts: 8,272 Money Saving Expert
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    edited 24 November 2010 at 6:42PM
    Options
    Budget_mum wrote: »
    "L. No laptop or internet access"

    At the time of posting 57 people voted this as child poverty. It beggars belief.

    That certainly counts as 'disadvantaged' in my book - whether it is poverty is a tougher question.

    Yet its far more important educationally than a TV (and can be used as the same) - in this modern world peopel without web access are disenfranchised in many ways
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.
    Don't miss out on urgent MoneySaving, get my weekly e-mail at www.moneysavingexpert.com/tips.
    Debt-Free Wannabee Official Nerd Club: (Honorary) Members number 000
  • luxor4t
    luxor4t Posts: 11,125 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Photogenic First Post
    edited 23 November 2010 at 11:03PM
    Options
    In Wales school trips tend not to be subsidised at all - due to extremely tight budgets and a noticeable funding gap http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/8483030.stm
    I can cook and sew, make flowers grow.
  • forever_skint
    Options
    I think the reason for poverty in a lot of cases is bad debt. Apparently, my children are living below the poverty line even though we both work which I think is hilarious because they want for ...... absolutely nothing!!
    March prizes: 6 x Crufts tickets, tickets to Wham live! Heck naked sausages, DVD :D:D:D
  • ka7e
    ka7e Posts: 3,093 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Options
    Sadly, it's not always about money. I see kids going to school with no warm coat and inappropriate shoes, being bought a packet of crisps and a fizzy drink for breakfast - while Mum buys her £6.50 packet of ciggies for the day! I personally have known kids that wore the same clothes until they were filthy rags, the clothes were then binned and replaced as their Mum said she couldn't afford a washing machine. On the other hand I know kids that never seem to wear the same clothes twice, have many pairs of shoes and coats for all occasions, yet are definitely malnourished.

    We live in a society where "Food Technology" (which in one local school has kids designing a new product and packaging for McDonalds!) has replaced "Home Economics", and youngsters lack the most basic education in finance, cooking, childcare and hygiene.
    "Cheap", "Fast", "Right" -- pick two.
  • Neddles
    Neddles Posts: 25 Forumite
    Options
    I find the 'less than two pairs of shoes' bit odd.

    Until my children started school (2 out of 3 of them so far), they only had/needed one pair of shoes. Even now, the older ones have a pair of school shoes and a pair of trainers. When well fitting shoes are so expensive and they grow out of them quickly, coupled with the fact that they ought not to be handed down to siblings, I'm not buying them more shoes than they can wear.
This discussion has been closed.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 344.7K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.6K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450.4K Spending & Discounts
  • 236.9K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 610.7K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.8K Life & Family
  • 249.6K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards