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What are the best windows for noise reduction?

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I live on a noisy road and want to replace my old wooden sash windows with modern windows that reduce noise as much as possible.

I want to buy the best possible window for noise reduction. The cost does not really matter - I don't want to spend less and get the wrong product.

It could be double glazed or triple glazed with argon gas, wooden frame, uPVC frame or any other design. Whatever minimises the noise the most is what I am searching for.

Can anyone help?

Thanks!
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  • telsokari
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    my in-laws live on the A406 North Circular and have triple glazing. Double didn't do much. The triple works well for them from what ive seen

    they have the triple upvc
  • Arfa__
    Arfa__ Posts: 584 Forumite
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    big-saver wrote: »
    ... and want to replace my old wooden sash windows with modern windows ...

    Nooooo!!

    Think very careful before you throw out these old windows, in most instances ditching them for uPVC will drop the value of your house. That said, you'll probably be able to flog them for a tidy bit of cash to those trying to correct other period houses that have blighted with uPVC...

    Does honestly sound like quite a predicament with the road noise. Many compromise by putting secondary glazing on top of the original sash windows, but I doubt this would be very effective against the noise. :(
  • amcluesent
    amcluesent Posts: 9,425 Forumite
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    You can still get wood framed windows with double-glazed units.

    To minimise sound you need two different types of glass, the outer sheet being laminated and about 6mm and the inner sheet standard glass an 4mm. These won't resonate together and transmit noise. You also need the largest air gap between the glass and very good sealing around the frame etc. or sound will 'leak in' between the frame and house wall. And kind of fence or hedge will also help.
  • Idonex
    Idonex Posts: 105 Forumite
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    edited 1 October 2010 at 1:24PM
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    Triple glazing will reduce the noise the most. That being said i'm not sure if you can triple glaze wooden sashs or put triple glazing in new wooden sashs. If it's any help i just had some quotes done to put in new wooden double glazed sashs with draft proofing, renovate the inside of the windows (weights, ropes etc) and to repair damaged sills and it was about 1k per window. I'm more concerned about the cold than the noise though!
  • big-saver_2
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    Arfa__ wrote: »
    Think very careful before you throw out these old windows, in most instances ditching them for uPVC will drop the value of your house. That said, you'll probably be able to flog them for a tidy bit of cash to those trying to correct other period houses that have blighted with uPVC...

    The wooden sash windows look great and are in keeping with the terraced house built in 1890). I would rather use wood than plastic but none of the companies I have approached offer wooded frames.

    How would I go about selling the old frames?
  • big-saver_2
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    amcluesent wrote: »
    To minimise sound you need two different types of glass, the outer sheet being laminated and about 6mm and the inner sheet standard glass an 4mm. These won't resonate together and transmit noise. You also need the largest air gap between the glass and very good sealing around the frame etc. or sound will 'leak in' between the frame and house wall. And kind of fence or hedge will also help.

    Thank you. I was told this same thing by someone else: double glazing with one pane thicker than the other. And a large air gap. They said that this was better than triple glazing with panes of the same thickness e.g. 4mm 4mm 4mm.

    Is there such a product as triple glazing for noise reduction e.g. 4mm 10mm 4mm?
  • Owain_Moneysaver
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    For noise reduction you need secondary double, or even triple glazing. Both outer and inner windows must be airtight, which will be a problem with old sash windows, and the reveals should be lined with sound-absorbent board. For triple glazing, use different weights of glass and have differing gaps between the windows. For noise reduction the bigger the gap (in inches, not mm) the better.

    Properly draught-stripping the sash windows will help a lot, and the existing windows may be able to have d/g panes fitted if the rebates are deep enough and you adjust the sash weights.

    Don't chuck the original sash windows, they are a feature.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
  • big-saver_2
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    For noise reduction you need secondary double, or even triple glazing.

    Are you suggesting that the secondary glazing is double or triple glazed instead of single glazed? I'd not thought of that or seen it offered.
    For triple glazing, use different weights of glass and have differing gaps between the windows.

    Do you know of any company that sells triple glazing with different weights of glass? The only triple I have found is the same thickness glass.
    Properly draught-stripping the sash windows will help a lot, and the existing windows may be able to have d/g panes fitted if the rebates are deep enough and you adjust the sash weights.

    This sounds like a specialist and expensive. Do people offer such a service?
    Don't chuck the original sash windows, they are a feature.

    What should I do with them? They look nice but they are terrible at insulation and noise reduction.
  • brig001
    brig001 Posts: 396 Forumite
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    If you want to reduce noise, don't forget general draught-proofing - a hole will let more noise through than a pane of glass. Try sealing the skirtings to the floorboards - it's amazing how much gets in there. I would also look at insulating under the floor with dense fibre-glass batts to reduce the noise (and heat loss) further.
  • big-saver_2
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    Thanks for your help everyone! :)

    I have received 2 quotes and have 1 more coming. I will update this thread with the prices and the result in case it can help anyone else.
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