Saving on my weekly shop

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  • At the start of the thread, someone said that they can't get a full shop at Aldi.

    Obviously it depends what you buy - I've been a regular Aldi shopper for over 20 years and the range has expanded significantly over the past few years - even since the thread started they now sell a lot of stuff that they never used to - such as a much wider range of spices and tinned and dried pulses.

    You could certainly do a full shop now, unless you want organic, or need to be gluten free for example. I do 90% of our shopping in Aldi and go to other supermarkets about once a month to stock up on the odd thing that they don't have or we prefer from elsewhere.

    Agree with terill that it's also good to look in Home Bargains etc for cleaning products.
  • I am always staggered that people throw away food. I don't think we discard more one apple every few months. Sometimes you can tell that you are just not going to eat up certain things, so lettuce can be chopped into spag bol or used as quick cabbage, and bananas can be frozen - they make wonderful handheld ice-creams.
    We also eat what is in season. This autumn our pear trees have gone into overdrive, so we've bought zero fruit and just eaten pears every day. Same when the plum tree was fruiting. We don't have an allotment, but a modest garden can produce a lot of stuff, like runner beans, very cheaply. If you have the space for fruit trees, get your family to buy them as Xmas/birthday presents.

    A friend of mine with 6 cats always bought cheap cat food in bulk - cats were fine with it.
    One week, she noticed a special offer on a gross of tins so decided to buy them. She got home to find partner had also seen the offer and also bought a gross. Together with the tins they had left that made over 350 tins of cat food !!!! Good thing they had space in the garage.
  • I am always staggered that people throw away food. I don't think we discard more one apple every few months. Sometimes you can tell that you are just not going to eat up certain things, so lettuce can be chopped into spag bol or used as quick cabbage, and bananas can be frozen - they make wonderful handheld ice-creams.
    We also eat what is in season. This autumn our pear trees have gone into overdrive, so we've bought zero fruit and just eaten pears every day. Same when the plum tree was fruiting. We don't have an allotment, but a modest garden can produce a lot of stuff, like runner beans, very cheaply. If you have the space for fruit trees, get your family to buy them as Xmas/birthday presents.

    A friend of mine with 6 cats always bought cheap cat food in bulk - cats were fine with it.
    One week, she noticed a special offer on a gross of tins so decided to buy them. She got home to find partner had also seen the offer and also bought a gross. Together with the tins they had left that made over 350 tins of cat food !!!! Good thing they had space in the garage.

    I can certainly empathise with that statement. I had to throw away a new potato on Sunday as I just couldn't face another one after I'd cooked them. Combine that with the three lettuce leaves and slice of cucumber I threw away the week before, that's the sum total of food thrown away in my home in the last four weeks.

    The amount of food some people threw away on that BBC TV programme the other night amazed me.
    "There are not enough superlatives in the English language to describe a 'Princess Coronation' locomotive in full cry. We shall never see their like again". O S Nock
  • claire1a
    claire1a Posts: 106 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    DawnW wrote: »
    It was an interesting thread though, and I for one, didn't mind revisiting it :)

    Neither did I!!! There are tips on here that I hadn't really thought about before or were a good reminder. If you should not bring back old posts then they should be deleted or have the comments blocked off.
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  • I am also astonished about how much food people throw away - the average is £700 per year per household - almost £15 a week! We throw away almost nothing (odd bit of salad that has gone off maybe). I freeze alsorts to avoid wastage - eg bread to use for toast or breadcrumbs and make soup out of veg at the end of it's life. I also do things like roast tomatoes if they aren't up to use raw.

    Some people must be buying loads and routinely throwing half of it away. Total madness, especially considering how much many people moan about how much food costs. Why not buy less and use what you buy and freeze things you don't get round to using?

    My first thought on the parsnips story was - that's disgusting, all that waste, but my second thought was 'why not make soup out of it' and then it can be canned or sold in long life packaging. It could even be sold frozen in Iceland/Heron etc or used in all sorts of places.

    A relative of mine works for the Junk food project, where they take food that is about to go to waste, but is perfectly edible, make meals out of it and either feed the homeless or sell it in a cafe. There needs to be more like this and as a nation we need to be less precious about cosmetic perfection and ridiculously conservative useby dates encouraging people to bin perfectly safe food.
  • Missed the program about waste....was it Monday night? will watch on catch up.
    Make £10 a Day Feb .....£75.... March... £65......April...£90.....May £20.....June £35.......July £60
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