Late Autumn/Winter/Early Spring crops? What's good to plant?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
8 replies 929 views
ChimeraChimera Forumite
492 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Ok.. so I'm addicted.. I love the whole gardening lark, and have been harvesting radishes and salad for a few months now..

BUT, I'm hoping for some year round crops, and I'm wanting to get organised..

I have sown already, purple sprouting broccoli and black kale - should I make more sowings later as well?

Any suggestions on what I can grow?

I don't have a greenhouse, but have a small coal frame which can go on one of the raised beds

Replies

  • flea72flea72 Forumite
    5.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    strangely most plants that you harvest over winter and early spring, need to be planted at the start of the sowing season, so things like sprouts and cabbage, should have been sown a good few months ago now

    most root vegetables arent good once the frosts hit, but you might get spuds up until christmas

    broad beans can be sewn year round, but can go soft once the frosts hit too

    depending on the size of your cold frame, you might be able to grow some lettuce, but i find root veg and cabbage just take up too much space to bother

    F
  • Kay_PeelKay_Peel Forumite
    1.7K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    Today, I've planted most of my winter veg - I'm growing black kale, dwarf curly kale, Red Admiral sprouting broccoli, Chevalier calabrese, potatoes, winter squashes and leeks.

    I leave a few carrots, some celeriac and parsnips in the ground just in case we have a mild winter before Christmas. They taste better once they've been exposed to the cold, I'm told.

    Garlic does well in pots over winter, I've found. It's best to plant them in October/November.

    You can also 'force' rhubarb over winter. Just put a bucket over the plant it if you haven't got one of those fancy terracotta 'chimney pot' rhubarb forcers and you'll get little juicy, sweet, bright pink stems.

    One thing to watch - winter veg attracts pigeons from miles around when there's nothing else to eat. It's best to put a bit of netting over the patch. Taking a lesson from Alys Fowler's TV Series The Edible Gardener I'm going to make a bird scarer made out of a potato and some bird feathers (if I can collect enough). Hang the feathery-potato near the patch and the pigeons think that they have been beaten to the food source by a very ugly and scary bird. :rotfl:

    :beer:
  • ChimeraChimera Forumite
    492 Posts
    Kay_Peel wrote: »
    Today, I've planted most of my winter veg - I'm growing black kale, dwarf curly kale, Red Admiral sprouting broccoli, Chevalier calabrese, potatoes, winter squashes and leeks.

    I leave a few carrots, some celeriac and parsnips in the ground just in case we have a mild winter before Christmas. They taste better once they've been exposed to the cold, I'm told.

    Garlic does well in pots over winter, I've found. It's best to plant them in October/November.

    You can also 'force' rhubarb over winter. Just put a bucket over the plant it if you haven't got one of those fancy terracotta 'chimney pot' rhubarb forcers and you'll get little juicy, sweet, bright pink stems.

    One thing to watch - winter veg attracts pigeons from miles around when there's nothing else to eat. It's best to put a bit of netting over the patch. Taking a lesson from Alys Fowler's TV Series The Edible Gardener I'm going to make a bird scarer made out of a potato and some bird feathers (if I can collect enough). Hang the feathery-potato near the patch and the pigeons think that they have been beaten to the food source by a very ugly and scary bird. :rotfl:

    :beer:

    Am I too late to sow?

    Ooo and I do have a pigeon dummy.. that'll come in useful!!
  • Kay_PeelKay_Peel Forumite
    1.7K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    No, you're not too late to sow winter veg directly into the ground. In fact, you can continue sowing right up until July and August.

    Winter squash is best started off indoors but germinates very quickly. Go ahead and sow things now because 'rules' about seed sowing are there to be broken. Our seasons have been so unpredictable that we can experiment and take a chance, I believe.

    I've been sowing carrot seeds in between my flowers today. I just draw a line in the dry soil with my finger, wet the soil with a watering can and sow the seeds in circles and figures of 8 rather than straight lines. I cover the seeds, water with a fine sprinkler on the watering can and step back to admire my artistic handiwork. ;)

    As well as putting in my kale, calebrese and broccoli plants today, I also sowed a few seeds of the same vegetables to give me a succession of produce - hopefully until March or April 2011.

    Go for it!

    :beer:
  • ChimeraChimera Forumite
    492 Posts
    That's great.. do you think I could keep some in large pots until I have space in the ground then transplant or do they need to be in final growing positions as seedlings?
  • Kay_PeelKay_Peel Forumite
    1.7K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    That's a very good idea to sow in pots and transplant them when you've got room.

    I've heard that brassicas don't like being moved but I've never had a problem with them.

    Here's a tip:

    When you're putting your cabbage/calebrese/brussell sprouts/broccoli etc into the ground, plant them deep - right up to the first leaves. They need to be anchored and sturdy for autumn gales and high winds.

    :beer:
  • ChimeraChimera Forumite
    492 Posts
    Thanks - you have inspired me!! Seeds will be ordered this week.. love squash and pumpkin, and cabbage, oh hates spouts but mat try a few to see if I can get him on them :)
  • ChimeraChimera Forumite
    492 Posts
    Just went a bit mad ordering seeds.. can't wait!!
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Lloyds Bank wrongly declares customer dead

Account was closed due to a misreading

MSE News

Cheap home insurance

Grab 100+ buildings insurance quotes & cashback

MSE Guides

£12 for 1L Baileys

Available at Tesco, Morrisons & Asda

MSE Deals