Do you do a lot for charidee?

Poll Started 23 August 2006. Do you do a lot for charidee? How much and how often do you give to charity? Which of the following is nearest what you do?

1. Charity begins at home. I need all my dosh and donate rarely
2. Coins in a bucket. I give as and when mainly to people collecting
3. Many one-offs. I give to lots of charities and sponsor people all the time
4. Regular monthly donation. I pay 0.5% or less of my income
5. Regular monthly donation. I pay 0.5% to 2% of my income
6. Regular monthly donation. I pay 2% to than 5%
7. Regular monthly donation. More than 5%
8. I don't believe in charity
9. I give time. I'm a volunteer
Vote here or click reply to discuss :)
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Replies

  • bridiejbridiej Forumite
    5.8K Posts
    I dont really fit into any of the categories, I'm between charity begins and home and many one offs.

    I donate once a year via standing order to my favourite charity, and will pop a few coins in buckets / piggybanks as and when I feel like it but not all that often.

    Over here they even come knocking on the door asking for money!!!

    I think the problem is there are so many charities all trying to get their hands on your cash it gets a bit wearing in the end....

    I just pop in now and then.... :)
    transcribing
  • MoJoMoJo Forumite
    542 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 100 Posts Combo Breaker
    Forumite
    I guess I'm a bit cynical when it comes to mainstream charities - I like to know where my money is going so I tend to only really give to local concerns, so I'm a 'charity begins at home' in that sense.

    I give stuff to charity shops but ones for local hospices and such like - I've seen too many local markets in African countries selling "Dead Men's Clothes" that still have labels from Sue Ryder, Oxfam & etc) God knows how many middle men have a slice of that pie.

    (I'm being very restrained here because if I'm not careful I'll be dragging the old soapbox out so I'll stop now :o )
  • This was a difficult one for me to answer as it didn't have one very important answer.... TIME!

    Personally I am a relatively skint person who lives on benefits as I have a disability which prevents me from working, however I have found that the one thing I am able to do is work voluntarily for charity.

    I can't afford to donate money, so for me I donate my TIME at my local Samaritans branch. We the volunteers are often forgotten about, however without us working for free there would be no charities providing vital services. Just remember we do exist too along with the people who do so generously donate to us thus enabling us to provide our services to the public.
    Save the planet - use a MENSTRUAL CUP!!!
  • As a mum of four I find it difficult to afford to give money to charity, but I do my bit by volunteering at my local Age Concern office. I have so far helped 4 elderly clients to apply for and successfully receive attendance allowance, some have been as much as £60 per week better off because of my help. I also volunteer for a local charity called signposts which helps to empower vulnerable people in the local community. I also used to volunteer once a week at the local luncheon club for elderly people, but have had to give that up now I'm starting Uni.
    Sam
  • MSE_MartinMSE_Martin MoneySaving Expert
    8.3K Posts
    Forumite
    Im going to hastily add time to the poll - better late than never
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.
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  • freebird65freebird65 Forumite
    1.8K Posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
    I usually pop the odd coin into charity buckets if it's something I believe in. I've also done a few treks in the past to raise money for UK based charities (and before anyone mentions this, I paid for my own trip).

    Lastly, I also sponsor two little girls - one in Malawi and one in India. Apart from the knowledge that I'm helping kids in desperately poor areas get a better start in life, it reminds me that I'm lucky enough to have a roof over my head, food in my stomach and (usually) enough money to be able to do something like this.
  • I don't fit into any of those catergories either. Charity isn't just about giving money, it's about giving time and skills too. I worked for a local charity for about 5 years and more or less ran it for 3 of that. When I stopped that I started up a local Gingerbread group and ran that for 5 years. I've also been known to visit the elderly, walk guide dogs, organise events, make cakes, man stalls at fetes and clear ponds. It can be quite fun and gives you a social life and a sense of satisfaction without costing you a penny.
    2008 Comping Challenge
    Won so far - £3010 Needed - £230
    Debt free since Oct 2004
  • What a poor place the world would be without charities. I do not earn much but I have always given 10% of my take-home pay to charity by monthly direct debit. Whatever your income, this can make a real difference to 3rd world and other communities. I get a real buzz for knowing that I am helping to make a (small) difference somewhere where there is needs far greater than mine. Oh, and don't forget to gift aid your donations - this can increase the real value of your gift by 28%.

    Phil 'o Stine
  • I've always given what I can to people, usually my time. However the idea of not giving to big charities because you don't know where the money is going (as MoJo believes) is strange. Do you believe that Oxfam is selling its clothes to people to sell on? I worked at an Oxfam for three years and I know how it works. We sort through the bags (some quite nasty) to find anything that can be sold in the shop. Other items that are torn, worn, highly unfashionable (and items that have not sold within a certain peroid of time) are rebagged to be sent off to another sorting house to be sorted into what can be sent onto the needy. Wheter or not that gets waylaid on it route by unscrupulous people is not the fault of Oxfam (or any other charity).
    Giving to the big charities is essential if we want to change the big things in life, campaigns, reasearch, vaccinations, legal aid are all helped by the money generated by these major charities.
    If you want to know where your money is going to why don't you visit their website or write and ask.
    Oh and major charities become major because they are fighting a big cause
    Oxfam- World poverty
    Sense- Blindness and Deafness
    Scope- Cerabal Palsy
    Mencap (and her sister Enable)- Mental handicap and learning disabilties
    Sue Ryder- Respite Care, Day care and Home care
    Cancer Research and the British Heart Foundation are self explanitary.
    Stop donating to these companies because they have become big and everyone loses.
  • MoJoMoJo Forumite
    542 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 100 Posts Combo Breaker
    Forumite
    I've always given what I can to people, usually my time. However the idea of not giving to big charities because you don't know where the money is going (as MoJo believes) is strange. Do you believe that Oxfam is selling its clothes to people to sell on? I worked at an Oxfam for three years and I know how it works. We sort through the bags (some quite nasty) to find anything that can be sold in the shop. Other items that are torn, worn, highly unfashionable (and items that have not sold within a certain peroid of time) are rebagged to be sent off to another sorting house to be sorted into what can be sent onto the needy. Wheter or not that gets waylaid on it route by unscrupulous people is not the fault of Oxfam (or any other charity).
    Giving to the big charities is essential if we want to change the big things in life, campaigns, reasearch, vaccinations, legal aid are all helped by the money generated by these major charities.
    If you want to know where your money is going to why don't you visit their website or write and ask.
    Oh and major charities become major because they are fighting a big cause
    Oxfam- World poverty
    Sense- Blindness and Deafness
    Scope- Cerabal Palsy
    Mencap (and her sister Enable)- Mental handicap and learning disabilties
    Sue Ryder- Respite Care, Day care and Home care
    Cancer Research and the British Heart Foundation are self explanitary.
    Stop donating to these companies because they have become big and everyone loses.

    I am only going on my own experiences. I made no accusations. I only expressed my opinion and my personal preferences.
    I have personally given my time to many of the major international charities and to co-ordinating with them and local charities in places that were my home at the time.
    All the 'big things in life', and many more, are real concerns in my present community and that is where I direct my donations and time.

    Bleugh! :)

    I refuse to get on the soapbox about this, it's a personal matter - I have no problem with what other people do, and I have my own reasons for what I do or don't do.
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