bereavement benefit

edited 31 January 2010 at 1:12PM in Benefits & tax credits
8 replies 5.4K views
wildwestwaleswildwestwales Forumite
11 Posts
edited 31 January 2010 at 1:12PM in Benefits & tax credits
Could someone tell me what happens after 52 weeks with regard to bereavement benefit. I was widowed on March 16th 2009. I am aged 52 - 53 in July and receive a spouse's Local Government Pension from my late husband. He was 55 when he died. I work 16 hours a week and have no other income. My son of 25 is still living at home and is in a low paid job. Thankyou

Replies

  • Hi,

    Hope you are ok, the first year is awful. My hubby died in 2002 and I get Widow Parents Allowance which I believe kicks in after the 52 weeks bereavement benefit BUT I think it is conditional on kids being in full time eduction - my 2 are. Hope someone can clarify for you as I was wondering myself what would happen when kids are no longer in FTE and if FTE includes University?

    Sheila
  • Wildwestwales

    I believe the answer is that after 52 weeks you get no more help regarding bereavment if you do not have children at school.

    You may qualify for WTC but for that you have to do 30 hours if you have no children, there are separate rules re people over 50 in that you can do 16 hours and get extra WTC if you are 50 or more and getting back into work.

    Other than that there is income support - if that still exists? - etc. how about council tax benefit?

    Your son may qualify for WTC as he is 25 and on a low income, which would need to be less than about 13k for him to benefit from any help.

    Needajob, I think the same applies for you once your children are classed as grown up.

    I am no expert, thought I would reply in advance of somone more knowledgeable, just so that you have some info.
  • beanybop wrote: »
    Wildwestwales

    I believe the answer is that after 52 weeks you get no more help regarding bereavment if you do not have children at school.

    You may qualify for WTC but for that you have to do 30 hours if you have no children, there are separate rules re people over 50 in that you can do 16 hours and get extra WTC if you are 50 or more and getting back into work.

    Other than that there is income support - if that still exists? - etc. how about council tax benefit?

    Your son may qualify for WTC as he is 25 and on a low income, which would need to be less than about 13k for him to benefit from any help.

    Needajob, I think the same applies for you once your children are classed as grown up.

    I am no expert, thought I would reply in advance of somone more knowledgeable, just so that you have some info.
    She wouldn't be eligible for IS as she works 16 hrs per week. I'm also not 100% sure about WTC.
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • Thanks beanybop - it is as I thought, just the question of what classes as FTE. Bit more scarry as my WPA is bumped up with late hubby's other contributions - nearly £190 per week.
  • Bereavement Allowance is paid for the first 52 weeks after the event and then finishes.

    The OP might be able to claim LHA/CTB if in rented accommodation, depending on savings and income or possibly WTC if she can bring her hours up to a minimum of 30 per week.
  • Needajob wrote: »
    Hi,

    Hope you are ok, the first year is awful. My hubby died in 2002 and I get Widow Parents Allowance which I believe kicks in after the 52 weeks bereavement benefit BUT I think it is conditional on kids being in full time eduction - my 2 are. Hope someone can clarify for you as I was wondering myself what would happen when kids are no longer in FTE and if FTE includes University?

    Sheila

    My understanding (boyfriend a widower) is that certain courses will qualify as FTE. His daughter was doing an SVQ/NVQ at the local college as he still received, but when she went onto an HNC it stopped (because its a higher level qualifcation, however she quit that course and the following year went back to do an SVQ in a different subject and it was restarted. I think it really does depend on the course. Remember he will also be eligable for EMA providing its not a higher course.
    :rotfl: l love this site!! :rotfl:
  • Working Tax Credit if you are over 50 and have recently started work

    If you are over 50, have recently started work for 16 hours or more a week and were getting certain benefits when you took your job, you can get Working Tax Credit. So, if you were previously getting Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance, Incapacity Benefit or Severe Disablement Allowance, state Retirement Pension paid with Pension Credit, or certain training allowances, you may be able to get Working Tax Credit when you start work. You must usually have been getting these benefits for at least six months. If you were not entitled to benefits, but you were getting national insurance credits, you may also be able to get Working Tax Credit. In some cases you can get Working Tax Credit because someone else was getting benefit which included an amount for you.
    If you are aged 50 or over and you are not sure whether you qualify for Working Tax Credit because you have recently started work, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • So, not eligible for WTC unless working at least 30 hours per week.
This discussion has been closed.
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