'Should married couples get a tax break?' poll discussion

edited 11 January 2010 at 2:07PM in Money Saving Polls
235 replies 27.5K views
Former_MSE_LawrenceFormer_MSE_Lawrence Former MSE
975 Posts
edited 11 January 2010 at 2:07PM in Money Saving Polls
Poll between 05-11 Jan 2010:

Should married couples get a tax break?

It's hit the political headlines, but is it right for the tax system to reward the institution of marriage?

Which of these is closest to your view?

A. Yes. Marriage should be rewarded. - 66% (14364 votes)
B. No. Though stable relationships, married or not, should be rewarded. - 9% (1981 votes)
C. No. Relationships shouldn't play any role in the tax system. - 25% (5564 votes)

This vote has now closed, but you can still click 'post reply' to discuss below. Thanks :)

[threadbanner]box[/threadbanner]
«13456724

Replies

  • it is more a case of you are penalised for being married , by the tax system /benefits system , why should your husband/wifes income matter to a person personally regarding benefits or tax?
    my favourite food is spare ribs
  • prowlaprowla Forumite
    12.4K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    What bigblackdog said.

    This government has been anti-marriage.
  • Dave101tDave101t Forumite
    4.2K Posts
    we would also need a break for civil partnerships, as well as one for athiests who would be discriminated against by imposing this terrible idea.
    Now imagine when someone really genuinely posts something like this!

    marriage is the bedrock of a well functioning society, directly contributing to the economy (one at home, one working or both working), pension pots( employment deductions), family values (proper unit, plus discipline) etc etc and should be rewarded by a 50% tax reduction.
    in short, marriage breakdown is one of the main causes of crap societies because of the knock on effects which are becoming apparent and moreso in the next 20 years. ho hum.
    Target Savings by end 2009: 20,000
    current savings: 20,500 (target hit yippee!)
    Debts: 8000 (student loan so doesnt count)

    new target savings by Feb 2010: 30,000
  • cake21cake21 Forumite
    1K Posts
    Dave101t wrote: »
    we would also need a break for civil partnerships
    Totally agree
    Dave101t wrote: »
    as well as one for athiests who would be discriminated against by imposing this terrible idea.
    Don't understand this...atheists can marry in non-religious ceremonies, or is that not what you mean?
  • robin_banksrobin_banks Forumite
    15.8K Posts
    prowla wrote: »
    What bigblackdog said.

    This government has been anti-marriage.

    Not married, been with my partner for 6 years, have 2 kids. Why should a married couple get a 'tax break' over us simply because we're not married.
    "An arrogant and self-righteous Guardian reading [email protected]".

    !!!!!! is all that about?
  • lemma1968lemma1968 Forumite
    1.4K Posts
    it is more a case of you are penalised for being married , by the tax system /benefits system , why should your husband/wifes income matter to a person personally regarding benefits or tax?

    Totally agree with you. It really hacks me off.
    2013 TARGET £30k
    2012 £26500 paid off.
    2011 £22750 paid off
    2010 £19800 paid off
    2009 MBNA Cleared 25.09.09 £34391.33 PAID OFF
    DFW Nerd 612 Proud to be dealing with my debts
  • Government, family, communities and religious institutions invading and running every aspect of our blessed lives isn't exactly looking funny. So, privatise marriage :snow_grin Belonging to just one person or a particule sex isn't grand either for many as we can see when we look around. So, save tax for something else and don't dictate lifestyles thankyou very much.
  • I voted for marriage to be supported through tax relief- perhaps bring back MIRAS for married couples- supporting sustainable households- that surely has to be good for society.

    And before you ask, I am happily married and could do with a break! ;)
  • MSE_MartinMSE_Martin MoneySaving Expert
    8.3K Posts
    Forumite
    Hi - there's an interesting discussion on this on my facebook page too...

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Martin-Lewis/73386220151#/note.php?note_id=241650243864&comments

    Though I'd repost a suggestion I'd made there...

    "One small note from a personal perspective. I lost my mother just before I was 12 - had this system existed, I suspect that meant that on top of the real horror we were in, this system could be adding a further financial impact - not only did we lose my mothers income but as tradgedy had forced my father into becoming a single parent he would've ... See Morelost the tax break for being married too on top of the family losing my mothers income.

    Now I don't believe that we should legislate for the exceptions, but I do think it is important we establish that the 'traditional family' model is quite far from the norm in modern society."
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.
    Don't miss out on urgent MoneySaving, get my weekly e-mail at www.moneysavingexpert.com/tips.
    Debt-Free Wannabee Official Nerd Club: (Honorary) Members number 000
  • Not married, been with my partner for 6 years, have 2 kids. Why should a married couple get a 'tax break' over us simply because we're not married.

    Couldn't agree more, me and OH been together for 12 years, have 3 kids, mortgage etc etc. Why should married people get tax breaks and not us?? - maybe a cheap trip to the local registry office is in order!
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Iceland now offers interest-free loans

But be careful - they'll impact your credit score

MSE News

Vanilla, veg & vexatious neighbours

This week's MSE Forum highlights

MSE Forum

Up to 10% off Macs and iPads

For students, teachers & parents of students

MSE Deals