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MONEY MORAL DILEMMA. Should Karl let the neighbours use his garden?

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MONEY MORAL DILEMMA. Should Karl let the neighbours use his garden?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Money Saving Polls
145 replies 43.3K views
MSE_JennyMSE_Jenny MSE Staff
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MSE Staff
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Money Saving Polls
Here's this week's hypothetical situation for you to cogitate on:
Should Karl let the neighbours use his garden?

Karl's just bought a new ground floor flat with its own private garden. Yet after moving in, he finds that the couple in the flat above are using the garden to hang washing out and occasionally to relax in. They were good friends with the previous owners who were fine with this, and they ask Karl nicely if he wouldn’t mind letting them use it. Should Karl let them keep using the garden?
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  • mrbrightside842mrbrightside842 Forumite
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    It depends if Karl minds. He's every right to say no, that they cannot use his garden. But if it's no hassle to him and he's not fussed about it, then it wouldn't be worth him saying no.
  • NessynooNessynoo Forumite
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    If they are happy to share the upkeep/maintenance/lawnmowing, then yes. Let them share.
    "It's official, MSE's harbouring total fruitcakes"
    >^..^<
  • In my view, he should say sorry but no, at the beginning. This is because, although it may not bother him initially, it probably will later on - he will find that they are using the garden/hanging out washing when he wants to use it and will feel awkward in his own garden. Once he has said yes, he won't be able to say no!
    :beer:
  • mrbrightside842mrbrightside842 Forumite
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    bigmuffins wrote: »
    In my view, he should say sorry but no, at the beginning. This is because, although it may not bother him initially, it probably will later on - he will find that they are using the garden/hanging out washing when he wants to use it and will feel awkward in his own garden. Once he has said yes, he won't be able to say no!
    :beer:

    That's very true. If he were to say yes, he'd have to set rules at the start, and he probably wouldn't think that far ahead. I don't think it would bother me if they were just nipping out with their washing, as long as they didn't have to get through my flat for it or anything like that, but I wouldn't like them socialising in it or using it for leisure when they fancied.
  • scotsbobscotsbob Forumite
    4.6K posts
    He rents it to them if he doesn't mind (might as well have it earning)

    If he does mind, he tells them no.
  • 6022tivo6022tivo Forumite
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    Its a YES as long as they fully maintain it.
  • edited 28 October 2009 at 1:24AM
    shueyshuey Forumite
    15 posts
    edited 28 October 2009 at 1:24AM
    He should seek to maximise his earning potential with least effort. He should draw up a garden lease with specific clauses in it as to:

    - times of useage to determine his / their expected utility
    - required rent (e.g. £5 per week)
    - maintenance of garden - ideally he should maximise his return on investment with least effort but this may have to be negotiated. Also wear and tear on the garden and associated costs need to be taken into account
    - He should look to give them a discount if they pay upfront for the year ie security of garden rent eg, £200 for whole years useage.
    - should think about ancillary issues such as if the garden is constantly in use the building may be less prone to burglars etc
  • CloudaneCloudane Forumite
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    Difficult one to answer - I'm not Karl! It's really up to him and his personality.

    If they seem like reasonable people I'd say yes... never know, we might end up friends. As we don't know each other properly yet I'd probably say "for a beer now and then" - most people I seem to encounter are really nice if you are nice to them, and would probably end up dropping off a whole multipack on a regular basis ;)

    But that's just me. I wouldn't say it's morally wrong to say no, and I doubt they'd hold it against him. Might be more of an ice maker than an ice breaker, but depends how important your privacy is to yourself!
  • No way.

    Ground floor flats pay a premium for the garden and the thought of looking at someones smalls flapping around out side is repellent. Also - people have a tendency to take advantage - and what starts off as a weekly wash for one neighbor may end up being a daily eyesore when the rest of the block of inhabitants decide to do the same.

    But if you were a nicer person than I am you could simply say - 'sure... use the garden during the day while I am at work ONLY!'

    But even this is expression of community spirit is apt to get abused.

    No - Be firm and friendly from the VERY first day. Be consistent and let all people know what to expect from you. Explain nicely but firmly that you have plans for the garden so they should invest in a dryer.
  • I wouldn't .......... he might not mind now, but he could do later. He is paying rent on it anyway so why should they get the benefit? Unless he charges them a small rent.
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