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From Carpet to "Lino" - Underlay?

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Have finally ripped up the minging carpet that's been in my bathroom, since I moved in 7 years ago :eek:

I'm planning lino, cushion floor or something similar.

What about the underlay and gripper rods left from the carpet?

Do I rip them up too? Or can I lay lino (or similar) on top?

:confused:
Warning ..... I'm a peri-menopausal axe-wielding maniac ;)

Comments

  • bob_a_builder
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    No they've goto to come up too
    and it would be usual to board over with hardboard (upside down) before laying flooring - but that might depend on current flooring, board or sheets or whatever


    note: this is just an opinion,despite nickname I'm not a builder
  • TomsMom
    TomsMom Posts: 4,251 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker
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    We've had vinyl laid in bathroom and kitchen, also en-suite.

    The en-suite was a new chipboard type floor and the vinyl was laid by the shop's fitter. As that room was part of a renovation, there was plaster etc. on the floor which we were going to scrape off before the fitters came. They turned up early and said they would do it. They didn't do it very well and you can see and feel the lumps underneath the vinyl and if it was a room that got a lot of use it would probably wear through and make a hole in the vinyl. Needless to say we complained and ended up not paying for the vinyl.

    The bathroom and kitchen were laid by a fitter recommended to us and not connected to the shop. He came out, checked the floors and told us if anything needed doing.

    The bathroom floor already had ply over the floorboards and this was scraped of any builder's debris until nothing could be felt. The kitchen floor is concrete and we had to use self-levelling compound and then the fitter checked it was smooth and told us to get rid of any rough bits using a rasp.

    If it's normal floorboards, as the kitchen in our old house, hardboard is usually laid over the top as bob says in previous post. The hardboard ideally should be damped first then nailed to the floorboards using some kind of tacks (sorry OH not here to ask) every so many inches (sorry again, but it's a lot of tacks).

    Underlay is not used, you need to get it up, and the grippers, and make sure your floor is flat and no sharp bits to wear through the vinyl. The cushionfloor type is nice and comfortable underfoot and doesn't feel cold either (I'm a barefoot person and notice these things on middle of the night visits to the loo!)
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