Planning permission for a climbing frame in front garden?

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We are planning to buy a climbing frame which would have to go in our front garden as our back garden already has a play house and landscaping/deep pond. I had designed a wooden one but as it had a ten foot tower which would have been visible to our neighbours across the road I've decided that TP challenger is the way to go.

We have a medium sized front garden with trees and a seven foot hedge at the front and sides. One house across the road is slightly over looked. RHS neighbour won't be able to see climbing frame at all. LHS neighbour is seperated from us by our hedge, a long drive to another house, another hedge and a large front garden. Their house is a long way back from the road so frame not visible.

The maximum frame height is about 6.5 feet. Have contacted council but can't imagine that this is high on their priority list but is high on daughters :). Does anyone know? It will be a moveable structure.
Trying to earn £2015 in 2015. Slightly early start ;). £175.88 today.

Comments

  • Chippy_Minton_2
    Chippy_Minton_2 Posts: 1,839 Forumite
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    I do know of one that has planning permission and that one is in a rear garden. Either ring or email your planning dept, you should have the answer within 24 hours.
    Hi, we’ve had to remove your signature. If you’re not sure why please read the forum rules or email the forum team if you’re still unsure - MSE ForumTeam
  • Atelier
    Atelier Posts: 164 Forumite
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    The TP climbing frames do not require any planning permission. They are very unobtrusive and a lot better than trampolines from a neibours perspective.

    The larger wooden ones could be classed as a temporary structure and therefore might have some requirement as to where they can be placed. I looked into this when I created a wooden town for the children and just needed to keep it a certain distance from the house and under 3.5m
  • redsclubbedup
    redsclubbedup Posts: 137 Forumite
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    its a bit of a grey area !

    you may have a covenant on your property that won't allow placement of something of this size in the front garden, you will have to check

    as the climbing frames are made of wood they are classed as temporary structures, and as such don't need planning permission - however the council could potentially misinterpret the reg's, to suit them - each one is different

    best bet is to check with your neighbours first, as they will be the ones to complain to the council if they dont like it, if they have no issues, then there shouldn't be an issue - you just have to watch for it getting nicked !
  • Atelier
    Atelier Posts: 164 Forumite
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    The TP Challenger is one of the lighter metal tubing climbing frames so should not even be classed as a temporary structure
    its a bit of a grey area !

    you may have a covenant on your property that won't allow placement of something of this size in the front garden, you will have to check

    as the climbing frames are made of wood they are classed as temporary structures, and as such don't need planning permission - however the council could potentially misinterpret the reg's, to suit them - each one is different

    best bet is to check with your neighbours first, as they will be the ones to complain to the council if they dont like it, if they have no issues, then there shouldn't be an issue - you just have to watch for it getting nicked !
  • planning_officer
    planning_officer Posts: 1,161 Forumite
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    its a bit of a grey area !

    as the climbing frames are made of wood they are classed as temporary structures, and as such don't need planning permission - however the council could potentially misinterpret the reg's, to suit them - each one is different
    Nope - it's not a grey area at all! And whether the climbing frame is made of wood, metal or cheese - it makes no difference (and just because it's wood does not mean it's temporary - unless it will be on the land for no more than 28 days in any one calendar year - that's "temporary"!)

    Council's do not misinterpret Regs - the first issue is whether it is 'development' - if it is permanent, of a reasonable size OR fixed to the ground, then it may well be development requiring planning permission (I would say that it's size and permanence will mean it is development). Then, the second issue is whether it is 'permitted development', i.e. not requiring a planning application - the relevant legislation for this is covered under Class E of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995, as amended. It's quite clear - any ancillary residential structure (which includes garages, sheds, greenhouses, climbing frames, summerhouses, kennels, etc) can be permitted development, subject to a number of criteria, which all need to be complied with. These are mainly concerning height, size, distance to boundaries etc, and are much more restrictive if you are in a conservation area or AONB. However, in your case, the most important criterion is that any such structure cannot be sited forward of the dwelling - i.e. in the front garden - so, yes, it may very well require planning permission!
  • AndysDad
    AndysDad Posts: 694 Forumite
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    I hope it does need planning permission and that you don't get it.Tell the kids to go up the park.I'm glad you don't live anywhere near me.....I feel much better now.
  • Becles
    Becles Posts: 13,167 Forumite
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    AndysDad wrote: »
    I hope it does need planning permission and that you don't get it.Tell the kids to go up the park.I'm glad you don't live anywhere near me.....I feel much better now.

    That's a bit harsh!

    There wasn't a park near here when my boys were little, so we put a climbing frame, swing and slide in the back garden. It was much better for their health having them running about outside in the fresh air, than cooped up inside on electronics.

    My youngest is two at the moment and she's just started getting into playing on it. She's too little to go to the park on her own, but likes playing on the stuff while I'm in the kitchen and I can keep an eye on her through the window.
    Here I go again on my own....
  • rosielx
    rosielx Posts: 306 Forumite
    edited 14 July 2009 at 4:35PM
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    AndysDad wrote: »
    I hope it does need planning permission and that you don't get it.Tell the kids to go up the park.I'm glad you don't live anywhere near me.....I feel much better now.

    What's wrong about asking a question about planning permission for a climbing frame?:confused: Our "local" non trashed playground is a ten mile round trip so for use one in the back garden makes sense.

    Anyway thankyou to the helpful replies. After checking with the planning officer the front garden is definately a NO, even for a metal one, but there are no local restrictions about the back garden (some councils won't let you put one up within 5 m of the back of the property)
    Trying to earn £2015 in 2015. Slightly early start ;). £175.88 today.
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