Forum Home» Motoring

Cleaning a car with no streaks

New Post Advanced Search

Cleaning a car with no streaks

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Motoring
19 replies 21.2K views
hemophobichemophobic Forumite
739 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Motoring
This may sound stupid to some people but I thought this time I was using the right method. First I rinsed down my car with the hose then using triple wax car shampoo and a mircofibre sponge I cleaned one small section at a time followed by a rinse after each section. Then I rinsed the car once more and dried it with a chamois. But after thAt I had streaks and splodges, WHAT AM I DOING WRONG!?!?
«1

Replies

  • goldspannersgoldspanners Forumite
    5.9K posts
    not drying it properly,or maybe it needs a bit of a polish?
    ...work permit granted!
  • hemophobichemophobic Forumite
    739 posts
    I don't know how to use car polish
  • anewmananewman Forumite
    9.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    When washing a car, it's considered best to use two buckets. One with your car shampoo and water in used to clean the car, the other with just water used to rinse the wash mit. Rinse the mit thoroughly before putting it in the clean bucket for more water and shampoo. Rinse the car with clean water and dry quickly.

    If you put the triple wax shampoo neat directly on the car or the sponge?! I suspect that caused the streaks.

    Best thing to dry a car with is a waffle weave microfibre towel.
  • ShoshannahShoshannah Forumite
    667 posts
    Have you tried one of the rubber squeegee things? You can use them to remove water from the car (just make sure you make sure that there is no grit or dirt stuck on the blade before each wipe). I bought mine for £6 but you may be able to get them cheaper.

    Remove most of the water with that then finish off with the chamois. Usually works for me. :)

    As for the polish/wax, just put some onto a damp cloth, rub it over the car one section at a time and leave it to dry to a haze. Then buff off with a clean dry cloth. I use one side of the cloth to buff off most of the wax; it usually goes a bit spotty but I then turn over the cloth to the clean side and continue buffing and it comes up nice. :) Avoid polishing on very sunny days as the sun dries the polish very quickly and is it harder to get a good finish.
  • hewhoisnotintheknowhewhoisnotintheknow Forumite
    3.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    my dad uses a wiper blade to dry his car, lol
  • anewmananewman Forumite
    9.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    Shoshannah wrote: »
    Have you tried one of the rubber squeegee things? You can use them to remove water from the car (just make sure you make sure that there is no grit or dirt stuck on the blade before each wipe).
    These are generally frowned upon by those who are into car cleaning. The thought is that the blade drags grit scratching the paint. Although my opinion is if you cleaned the car properly there should be hardly any grit anyway :D
  • ShoshannahShoshannah Forumite
    667 posts
    anewman wrote: »
    These are generally frowned upon by those who are into car cleaning. The thought is that the blade drags grit scratching the paint. Although my opinion is if you cleaned the car properly there should be hardly any grit anyway :D

    I think grit scratches could be a possibility, which is why I said make sure the blade is clean each time (perhaps wipe it down?). Never had a problem personally though.

    In my case it hardly seems relevant; my cars have had scratches from many sources including:
    - an unsecured gazebo blowing into the air and landing on car.
    - a house 'SOLD' sign falling on car.
    - a local child scratching 'BICH' onto car.
    - random person using car boot as a platform for an unidentified (red) object.

    And those are just a few. Since my current car has a dent in the door and C-pillar from a boy on a BMX plummeting head first into it, a few squeegee scratches aren't too much of a worry for me. :rotfl:

    But I can understand if some people with shinier cars wish to avoid.
  • Bowdyjan18Bowdyjan18 Forumite
    316 posts
    anewman wrote: »
    these are generally frowned upon by those who are into car cleaning. The thought is that the blade drags grit scratching the paint. Although my opinion is if you cleaned the car properly there should be hardly any grit anyway :d


    you will always get particles in the water such as dust blowing about in the air and sticking to the water.
  • anewmananewman Forumite
    9.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    Shoshannah wrote: »
    In my case it hardly seems relevant; my cars have had scratches from many sources including:
    - an unsecured gazebo blowing into the air and landing on car.
    - a house 'SOLD' sign falling on car.
    - a local child scratching 'BICH' onto car.
    - random person using car boot as a platform for an unidentified (red) object.
    Sounds like you live near me :D
This discussion has been closed.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support