Care Home Funding - Transferring Asset?

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  • KatykatKatykat Forumite
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    Minnie, this is a standard letter they always send out. My F in L got one when he applied to increase his DLA. He also backed out as he didn't want to lose the small amount he got. That was 5 yrs ago. Recently, a benefits advisor managed to convince him to apply again, he was then awarded the full allowance plus full mobility allaowance. It makes me mad to think he has lost 5 yrs. So go for it, if he is in a care home, he obviously must need the attendance allowance. As for your dad buying half the house at a reduced rate, it sounds a bit uneccesary. Your grandad has too much capital to claim any help with care fees, so he doesn't have to declare his assests to anyone. Your dad would just be paying for something that he is going to inherit anyway.
    :smileyhea A SMILE COSTS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING
  • minnie123minnie123 Forumite
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    Yes they say it to put you off but he only has one leg and the other leg was broken a few weeks back so he can hardly do anything for himself now. I am going to fill the forms in and send them. He lost his leg when he was in his early 40's and he has never claimed a penny because that is what he is like - it makes me so mad.
    Eleventh Heaven (#123):
    :A1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11:A
  • margaretclaremargaretclare Forumite
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    minnie123 wrote: »
    Yes they say it to put you off but he only has one leg and the other leg was broken a few weeks back so he can hardly do anything for himself now. I am going to fill the forms in and send them. He lost his leg when he was in his early 40's and he has never claimed a penny because that is what he is like - it makes me so mad.

    Minnie, perhaps 30-40 years ago there was less that could be claimed and also, perhaps he learned to cope well with the one leg - some people do! There are numerous well-known examples of people who have coped well and led useful, active lives after losing a limb. There used not to be the kind of 'culture' around that said 'oh, I'm disabled, I can't do...what can I claim, what am I entitled to?' Even disabled people thought first and foremost of 'what can I do for myself' rather than 'what can I claim and what can be done for me?'

    I recall my first husband, who never worked from 1976 because of progressive heart disease, but he still did a lot at home and was much involved with Sea Cadets. I couldn't have carried on my career without him 'holding the fort'. He didn't claim disability benefits or means-tested benefits.
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • ErrataErrata Forumite
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    The fact that he's in residential home provides evidence that he needs care both day and night. Apply again - you can apply on his behalf and Age Conern, Help the Aged, DIAL or CAB will all help with completing the application form if you need help to get the wording right.
    .................:)....I'm smiling because I have no idea what's going on ...:)
  • Minnie, perhaps 30-40 years ago there was less that could be claimed and also, perhaps he learned to cope well with the one leg - some people do! There are numerous well-known examples of people who have coped well and led useful, active lives after losing a limb. There used not to be the kind of 'culture' around that said 'oh, I'm disabled, I can't do...what can I claim, what am I entitled to?' Even disabled people thought first and foremost of 'what can I do for myself' rather than 'what can I claim and what can be done for me?'

    I recall my first husband, who never worked from 1976 because of progressive heart disease, but he still did a lot at home and was much involved with Sea Cadets. I couldn't have carried on my career without him 'holding the fort'. He didn't claim disability benefits or means-tested benefits.

    Are you suggesting that because he has managed without claiming anything that he shouldn't do so now? I don't imagine 30/40 years ago there was AA but thats not stopping you claiming it now or whatever it is you claim.

    I really fail to see the point in your post.
  • margaretclaremargaretclare Forumite
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    Quite simply, I was merely pointing out that 30 or 40 years ago, when Grandad lost his leg, he may have been able to cope much better than he does in later years, and also, at that time there were fewer benefits that were available to claim. I can't see why that should be so difficult to understand.
    Are you suggesting that because he has managed without claiming anything that he shouldn't do so now?

    .No, I didn't suggest any such thing. How someone can cope in their 40s will be different to how they cope in their 80s. I responded to what Minnie wrote:
    he has never claimed a penny because that is what he is like - it makes me so mad.
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • minnie123minnie123 Forumite
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    It makes me mad because he has worked amazingly hard his whole life paid his taxes and never claimed for anything off the state even when he lost a limb and struggled to keep his business afloat. Then in later life when he does need help they charge him £26,000 a year for what other people are getting for free. Now that makes me mad!!
    Eleventh Heaven (#123):
    :A1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11:A
  • weanieweanie Forumite
    262 Posts
    I agree Minnie - from my perspective, I find it unfair and although I quite agree that we all have a huge problem paying for the care of the elderly [I am also a tax payer along with my husband and adult children], I can't see the decisions regarding fair as being even-handed.
    The distinctions between 'care' and 'nursing care' seem to be engineered to avoid fundng for people who are unlucky enough to draw dementia in life's lottery.
  • margaretclaremargaretclare Forumite
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    minnie123 wrote: »
    It makes me mad because he has worked amazingly hard his whole life paid his taxes and never claimed for anything off the state even when he lost a limb and struggled to keep his business afloat. Then in later life when he does need help they charge him £26,000 a year for what other people are getting for free. Now that makes me mad!!

    But that was how people were in your Grandad's generation, which is what I - perhaps clumsily - tried to point out in my earlier post. They had their pride, they were independent, but that kind of outlook is not what one commonly sees around nowadays.

    I too have worked hard all my life, so has DH, in fact we have nearly a century in the workplace between us, responsible jobs and paying taxes. But the kind of mobility problems one may have in one's 40s or 50s become increasingly difficult to cope with as time goes on. You lose muscular strength, for one thing. Even with the bone and joint problems I had in my 50s I was still active and did a lot of things I perhaps was unwise to do. Nowadays, I can't walk as far as the bus stop.
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
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