Local anaesthetic and side effects

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
15 replies 11K views
BallandChainBallandChain Forumite
1.9K Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
I had to go to my GP surgery today to have a mole removed. I had a local anaesthetic to numb the area and felt fine. Then the Dr started to cut the mole out and I came over really sick and hot. I thought I was going to be sick but wasn't thankfully. He told me to take deep breaths and as I was lying down anyway (I couldn't see what was going on) he reclined the head part of the couch so I was completely flat on my back. I really didn't feel well and although I was a little nervous don't think that it was my nerves.

The colour drained from my face and then I got pins and needles in both hands. After being stitched up the Dr took my blood pressure and then the nurse did too. I think my blood pressure must have gotten low (I had eaten earlier) as I felt weak and light headed. Nurse said "It's going up" referring to blood pressure as my blood pressure gradually returned to normal. I think it was 90 over 60 when it was first read. Is that low?

I'm ok now but it took me a while to recover and wondered if anyone else has heard of a reaction like this to local anaesthetic? I thought I'd be ok as I heard you usually get nausea with general anaesthetic. The Dr told me that what I had was a normal reaction as a lot of people get this! I'm curious if anyone else has experienced this.
«1

Replies

  • Local anaesthesia can commonly cause low blood pressure - its a perfectly normal and common reaction and why we do still perform removal of moles in hospital. If you were having a much larger dose of local (epidural, spinal, arm or leg block) fluids and oxygen would have been given as this prevents low blood pressure but this would have been in a hospital environment anyway.

    I think what happened is your blood pressure dropped too quickly rather than getting too low which is why you felt sick and dizzy but yeah, nothing to worry about. People think that local anaesthetics are nothing to worry about when they do pose problems and risks along with any type of anaesthetic. I always faint when I have a local at the dentist!
  • VfM4meplseVfM4meplse
    34.3K Posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well done for getting through this. Your experience is unlkely to have anything to do with the LA, more that like most folks you find it a bit unsettling to have a small chunk of your skin removed! What you have been through is a natural "fright" reaction._pale_

    The LA is just that - local. In all likelihood it was mixed with adrenaline to keep the area anaesthetised for longer.

    Just cling onto the words of the Big O: its over, its over, its o-o-over....! :j :j :j
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy :D...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...I love chaz-ing!
  • As well as it possibly being a side effect of the local, it is possible that you had a slight panic attack, which can cause the same side effects.
    Gone ... or have I?
  • Thanks guys! I've had local anaesthetic for teeth removal in the past and that had no effect on me.

    lol @ the pale smiley! That's how I went.
  • VfM4meplseVfM4meplse
    34.3K Posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Wolfsbayne wrote: »
    If you were having a much larger dose of local (epidural, spinal, arm or leg block) fluids and oxygen would have been given as this prevents low blood pressure but this would have been in a hospital environment anyway.

    For minor surgery we are talking about a teeny tiny subdermal dose. Hospital referrals are made where complications are suspected.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy :D...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...I love chaz-ing!
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
    9.8K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    I think the bottom line here is that you just nearly fainted.

    Good old fashioned vasovagal attack!

    Happened to me when I was training and assisting in an operation to remove a tumour from near someone's eye. (Yes I know it's not strictly dentistry, but we get to do all sorts of fun stuff around the face)

    Surgeon said to me just before he got to the really juicy bit "Are you OK?"

    "Fine" I said

    "Good, because I don't want you fainting as I retract the eyeball"

    Cold, sweaty, nauseous, and the next thing I knew I was in the next room with my head between my knees.

    Nothing to do with anything that I'd eaten, been injected with or taken. Just body's 'fight or flight' reaction going over the top.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • cazziebocazziebo Forumite
    3.2K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Toothsmith - I nearly always get this kind of reaction at the dentist's... I never used to and the dentist advised me it's a newer more reliable anaesthetic than used previously. He tells me to make sure I eat before I go, but that hasn't made any difference.

    It's not a panic attack, but could see how it could be observed as one. I become dizzy, my heart seems to race - it's awful, but lasts less than two minutes. One of my colleagues reports the same kind of reaction - she blames it on the fact her dentist has gone private!
  • Thanks Cazziebo, I really don't think it was a panic attack. I was pretty calm, if a little nervous and feeling quite proud of myself that I was quite calm despite the fact I was 'under the knife'. I know! How dramatic, lol but I've had teeth out and hadn't had a reaction like that. Also (close your eyes Toothsmith) I had to have a biopsy of my cervix without anaesthetic, it was painful but I didn't faint and was up and about in no time. I didn't think it is possible to faint lying down surely?

    Edited to add: Are there different anaesthetics used for teeth and body?
  • ErrataErrata Forumite
    38.2K Posts
    10,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Sometimes people respond to a treament by becoming a little physiologically shocked - drop in BP, rapid pulse, feeling sick. Pretty much what the OP describes and it's a natural response.
    .................:)....I'm smiling because I have no idea what's going on ...:)
  • cazziebocazziebo Forumite
    3.2K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    This is before any treatment starts...

    My dentist said that the injection now includes adrenalin, and these are physical reactions to adrenalin. The adrenalin means that they can localise the frozen area more specifically, and the anaesthetic will wear off more quickly.

    Just repeating what he told me...
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Energy price cap could be extended beyond 2023

New plans have just been announced by the Government

MSE News

Cheap contents insurance for tenants

DON'T assume your landlord covers you

MSE Guides

Summer sizzlers round-up

Incl £2ish sun cream & £1.50 disposable BBQs

MSE Deals