MONEY MORAL DILEMMA. Should Lucky Luke give back his hardship grant?

Here's this week's hypothetical situation for you to cogitate on:
Should Lucky Luke give back his hardship grant?

Lucky Luke is a student and struggling horribly to survive, partly as he doesn't manage his money well. He applied for a hardship grant from the limited Uni fund and has been awarded £1,000. On the day it goes in his bank account, to celebrate, he buys a lottery scratch card (part of the reason for his poor finances) and wins £5,000
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  • no, he shouldn't give it back, but he should use the £5,000 to pay off some debt, count himself very lucky to have had this windfall and pledge to use the £1,000 to keep him going on the basics for as long as possible, knowing that lightning doesn't strike twice and he has been very fortunate.
    :D"Stay Wonky":D

    :j:jBecome Mrs Pepe 9 October 2012 :j:j
  • Definately no, most universities have "unlimited" resources for hardship grants, so anyone else in need would still get theirs regardless if he gave it back or not. That said though, he needs to make sure he doesnt waste his cash this time
    Chipping away at the mortgage...
    2013:£419k @ 3.14%
    2016:£385k @ 1.79%
    2019:£275k @ 1.84%
    2024: ??
  • I volunteer for a student advisory service, and often have to talk to students who, for whatever reason, are having financial difficulties. The majority of these cases are self-inflicted, spending way too much money on booze or clothes or dvds or whatever. And, yes, occasionally gambling.

    He's doing nothing wrong by not repaying the money, the money was given to him with no strings. It wasn't given to him that if he made £5000 in five years, by the end of uni, or the end of the year, he'd have to give it back. So why should it change things when it was the end of that day?

    Hopefully the humbling experience of applying for the hardship and having someone look over all his finances, make him realise how lucky he is to have won the money. But when most universities end up with surplus in the hardship fund at the end of the year, he shouldn't be made to return it.
  • CerisaCerisa Forumite
    350 Posts
    Yes he should. After several disasters - suitcase stolen (90% of my clothes, my passport, my straighteners, half my shoes), mobile phone broken, not getting my usual work in the holidays - I was forced to apply for help with my rent near the end of the year, obviously when the pot was running short. I was mortified but luckily, they decided to give me the money. That money should go back to the communal pot to go to someone who really needs it. Say, so a single mum can be helped with nursery fees.

    Universities do not have 'unlimited resources'. What on earth gave you that idea?
    £1600 overdraft
    £100 Christmas Fund
  • Yes, he should.
    Be nice, life is too short to be anything else.
  • Personally I would advise he give it back with thanks that they did consider him a hardship case at the time but he has had a bit of luck which more than meets the hardship grant at present and hopefully in the future this will go in his favor should he ever be put in the same hardship position as he has just managed to get out of.

    regards
    crystal
    £2.00 savings club =£2.00
  • I think he should give it back. It would be able to help another person that is struggling. I don't believe that uni's have "unlimited resources"!
  • no, he shouldn't give it back, but he should use the £5,000 to pay off some debt, count himself very lucky to have had this windfall and pledge to use the £1,000 to keep him going on the basics for as long as possible, knowing that lightning doesn't strike twice and he has been very fortunate.


    Seconded!:T
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Forumite
    0 Posts
    Holiday Haggler
    Newbie
    No, he shouldn't pay it back - but he certainly shouldn't be eligible for any further emergency loans. Most students in 'horrible debt' would end up blowing the money on a PS3 and lots of shandy on nights out.
  • Time and time again we here about the 'miracles' of lottery wins. Sadly they never seem to happen to many of us. Anyone who does the lottery risks changing their lives, and possibly their relatives and friends lives too.

    So why isn't the question...."should he (or anyone) be allowed to do the lottery?" Lottery funding has provided for a darn site more than many people think. No he shouldn't even think about paying it back, he owes nobody nothing.

    Count your good fortune my son, and go and enjoy it while luck is on your side.
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